Fifth Grade Science Activities and Experiments

It's hard to deny that science inspires a sense of wonder, and our fifth grade science activities and experiments are sure to draw your child in. We have everything from nature activities that just scratch the surface of biological concepts and truths, to more complex experiments that illustrate the scientific laws that govern our universe. Perhaps your kid will be captivated by some of our optical illusion demos or the mind blowing candle underwater experiment. Or maybe she'll simply be impressed by the diversity of life all around her as she records her observations in a Darwin journal. Browse our science activities and show your kid just how cool science can be!

Looking for science ideas that revolve around the scientific method? We also have an impressive selection of Science Fair Projects.

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Here's an experiment that will have your child experimenting with cake ingredients to learn about the chemical reactions that happen when a cake's in the oven.
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In this activity, your child will make her own "quicksand" to better understand how a substance can be both fluid and solid at the same time.
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This experiment uses a yeast solution, liquid detergent, and hydrogen peroxide to produce an exciting reaction like no other!
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Teach your child some scientific basics as you explore the densities of various liquids in this fun experiment.
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In this activity, your kid will watch coal turn into crystals right before her very eyes, and learn some science along the way!
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Grow borax crystals and get your child excited about Earth science with this crafty science experiment.
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In this activity, you'll not only make your own bouncy balls at home, but your child will also learn how polymers are made.
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Show your child how to construct a homemade thermometer. It's hands-on fun and a great way to complement what he's learning about this instrument in school.
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Help your child understand surface tension by showing her how she can create a "skin" on top of water.
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Believe it or not, the common spud has enough electrochemical energy to power a small digital clock. Show your sixth grader how!
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Help your fifth grader execute this experiment involving a lit candle (submerged in water!) to show him the wonders of heat energy transference.
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By using static electricity generated from their body, a child can cause a small fluorescent lamp bulb to light up!
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This activity will introduce your child to the four different components of blood and give him a fun way to visualize its properties.
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Based on the concept of water's "freezing point," this activity entails the lowering of water's freezing point to chill ice cream!
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Some fossils have been been preserved for billions of years! Help your kid understand how fossils are created and preserved with this crafty project.
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Turn the common time killer of constructing paper airplanes into a lesson on the physics of aerodynamics and flight with this fun science activity.
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This simple experiment serves as an introduction to the greenhouse effect.
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Using simple materials found around your home, you can reinforce the static electricity concept by helping your child build a simple device with zapping power!
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Science isn't ho hum anymore when it involves building catapults to teach your fifth grader about projectile motion.
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Check out this mind-blowing experiment in which a hard-boiled egg will fit through an impossibly small opening with the help of only a few matches!

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