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Candice Abellon's Blog

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Happy Birthday, Amelia Earhart!

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014 by

AE_and_Vega

The summer is full of adventure. And this summer, Amelia Rose Earhart became the youngest woman to fly around the world in a single-engine plane. No, she’s not a relative of that Amelia Earhart, but she was named after her.

The original Amelia Earhart set many records in aviation, like in 1932 when she became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She was an icon in her time. She is still an icon today, and has inspired the many women pilots who have flown the skies.

Amelia Rose Earhart was just one of those women inspired by the original AE. Amelia Rose completed her around-the-world trip on July 14, 2014 when she and her co-pilot landed in Oakland, CA. The flight was made in honor of her namesake the famous 20th century aviatrix, and to benefit the Fly With Amelia Foundation. The foundation awards flight-training scholarships to young women, and works to raise public interest in aviation in general.

In June 1937, nearing her 40th birthday Amelia Earhart took off with her co-pilot at the start of what was meant to be an around-the-world journey that would have made her the first woman to circumnavigate the globe. Her tragic disappearance has gone down as one of the biggest mysteries in history. In light of her determination, grit, and passion for piloting, not to mention her gift for writing and editing, we tip our hats this July 24 to Miss Earhart on her 117th birthday.

Grammar Graphics: Hoard vs Horde

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013 by

We know that mastering the English language and all its quirks can be tricky, so we’ve rounded up some commonly mixed-up words and invented some silly scenes to go along with them. Use our Grammar Graphics to help make these words’ definitions — and differences— stick!

There are so many words in English that sound the same but have different meanings and different spellings: In and innknot and not, let’s not even get started about totoo and two, and the great their/there/they’re war that rages on social media. The name for these kinds of words is homophones, and since they sound the same, and there’s really only one true way to conquer them:  Repetition. This GIF tackles a tricky one that might be familiar to older kids:  hoard vs horde.

(Psst — take your time with this one. You’ll see why in a few seconds!)

Horde and Hoard

 

What words sometimes give you the slip?

Grammar Graphics: Horse vs Hoarse

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013 by

We know that mastering the English language and all its quirks can be tricky, so we’ve rounded up some commonly mixed-up words and invented some silly scenes to go along with them. Use our Grammar Graphics to help make these words’ definitions — and differences— stick!

Feeling a little horse?

hand-horse
 

Wait, that’s not right.

Try as we might to avoid getting sick, it just seems inevitable this time of year—it starts off with a cough or a sniffle, and one morning you wake up with a hoarse throat that doesn’t go away. There’s a sticky “ack!” in the back of your throat. That’s one way to remember the difference of this homophone pair: Being sick puts the “a” in hoarse. Get it?

Hoarse and Horse

Have you avoided catching a cold this year? What’s your secret?

Grammar Graphics: Desert vs Dessert

Tuesday, November 19th, 2013 by

We know that mastering the English language and all its quirks can be tricky, so we’ve rounded up some commonly mixed-up words and invented some silly scenes to go along with them. Use our Grammar Graphics to help make these words’ definitions — and differences— stick!

Speaking of dessert, let’s take this week to tackle desert vs dessert.

A classic mnemonic device to differentiate the spelling of these two words is to tell yourself that when it’s dessert, you want to ask for seconds (because there are two S’s in dessert…get it?). We just wanted to top that off with a delicious desert scene and definitions.

Desert and Dessert

What dessert do you want a piece of this holiday season?

Grammar Graphics: Peace vs Piece

Tuesday, November 12th, 2013 by

We know that mastering the English language and all its quirks can be tricky, so we’ve rounded up some commonly mixed-up words and invented some silly scenes to go along with them. Use our Grammar Graphics to help make these words’ definitions — and differences— stick!

Here’s the first of our super-shareable Grammar Graphics: Peace vs Piece.

Peace and Piece

I find  peace in sipping a cup of coffee while reading a book, and I wouldn’t turn down a piece of cake to go with that.

Where or when do you find your piece of peace?

Weird Workday Discoveries: The Librarians of Congress

Friday, May 24th, 2013 by

Over the course of our workday, we editors often find ourselves learning all sorts of strange and amazing information about history, science and literature. We’d like to share some of our favorite finds with you. Today’s post is brought to you by The Library of Congress and editor Candice Abellon.

Did you know we’re only on our 13th Librarian of Congress? He was appointed in 1987.

As it turns out, our official Librarians of Congress are a pretty stylin’ bunch. In honor of how much we rely on the LOC around here and in keeping with the spirit of Historic Preservation Month, we’d like to salute all thirteen librarians and their stylish ways. Check out George Watterson, appointed in 1815, rocking the fauxhawk nearly 200 years before David Beckham made it famous:

George Watterson

See the full list of librarians here and watch how, though they’re all in suits and ties, the fashion evolves. Note the moustache makes a strong showing in the late 1800s.

Zombie Workbook Errors Fixed

Monday, May 13th, 2013 by

 

Education.com Zombie

The zombies have arrived at Education.com. Fast ones, slow ones, nice ones and no-ones. (Sorry — we went on a department field trip to a Dr. Seuss exhibit last week; it is clearly still with me.)

We recently published a new batch of workbooks, and Zombpocalypse was one of them. We were so excited! And then, technical issues. It happens sometimes. Anyone who downloaded the workbook early on will know that two of the pages showed up mysteriously blank:  in the middle of a history of zombies and between the anatomy of the brain and emergency survival tips.

Luckily, we’ve fixed it. The text and images are now in their proper place and the zombies are here to stay. Users who downloaded workbooks with missing pages may try downloading again.

No thank you, said the editor to the ad.

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013 by

“You’re worthless.”

Did that ad just tell me I’m worthless?

As an editor I’m constantly clicking through Education.com—finding articles, checking on new worksheets, looking at content much like one of our members might. And like anyone on the Internet I’m moving fast. So I was already waiting for the next webpage to load when I read that.

I laughed and joked to myself, I think I just got bullied by our website.

A week later I saw it again. It might have told me “Everybody hates you.” This time I was ready; (more…)