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Posts Tagged ‘bring science home’

Education.com Partners with Scientific American’s Bring Science Home

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

We at Education.com are proud to announce our partnership with Scientific American’s Bring Science Home. Every Thursday, Bring Science Home provides parents with a fun, science-related activity to do with their six- to 12-year-olds that can be completed with simple household materials in under an hour. The projects themselves are fantastic because they give parents and children the opportunity to engage in hands-on learning together, and are written in such a way that the scientific content is enlightening to people of all ages. It’s a truly fantastic feature.

Bring Science Home: No Experience Necessary

“As a kid, I often spent an afternoon after a big rain storm with my brothers tromping down to a local drainage stream tBring Science Homeo see what the water had washed in,” writes Katherine Harmon, associate editor for Scientific American and managing editor of Bring Science Home, in her introduction to the feature last spring. “And it wasn’t unusual to find  sitting around the kitchen table with our hands coated in a green, oozy cornstarch-and-water mixture, wondering at its weird properties. My parents aren’t scientists or university professors, and my brothers and I didn’t think of these diversions as science. But they were—and these simple activities, along with the questions and conversations they prompted, have stuck with me into adulthood.”

Bring Science Home is built on this guiding principle: you don’t have to have any formal background in science whatsoever in order to promote science literacy in your home. Even American astrophysicist and science communicator Neil deGrasse Tyson acknowledges this in an American Scientist interview, as he recounts his two-year-old daughter spilling a glass of milk on the dining room table: “When she watched it drizzle between the leaves, and then drip down to the floor, she was performing experiments in fluid dynamics. Let ‘em play. When you do, the kids do not have to be reintroduced to ways of questioning nature, and the task of promoting science would be a trivial exercise.”

By contributing content to Bring Science Home, Education.com helps parents facilitate an environment where kids can easily follow through on their own innate inquisitiveness. The content we contribute is structured in the sense that it gives parents and kids a clear procedure to follow and accessible scientific explanations that are tied directly to what parents and kids saw happen—but it’s informal in the sense that the content isn’t designed to lecture. Instead, it encourages kids (and their parents) to ask questions think critically about what they’re exploring.

Whenever we choose an article to rewrite from Education.com’s vast library of science fair project ideas, we make sure that the article lends itself particularly well to creating these kinds of enriching experiences…but we must admit that we have a strong bias towards selecting projects that make kids and parents go “Whoa.”

Check out what we’ve contributed to Bring Science Home so far. These projects are sure to be a big hit with your little evil geniuses.

Seesaw Science: The Hammer-Ruler Trick

Sonic Science: The High-Frequency Hearing Test

Soapy Science: How Microwaves Affect Matter

Steamy Science: Demonstrating Condensation

Sight-Line Science: Candle in the Mirror