All About Matter: Chemical vs. Physical Changes

  • Fifth Grade
  • Science
  • 115 minutes
  • Standards: 5-PS1-2
  • 5.0 based on 1 rating
September 20, 2015
by Sanayya Sohail

Show your class how combining two objects can create a new object in this hands-on science lesson. Students will learn why breaking apart an object doesn't change its mass.

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to differentiate between physical and chemical changes. Students will be able to differentiate between physical and chemical properties of matter.

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Lesson

Introduction (5 minutes)

  • Begin the lesson by asking your students what physical and chemical changes they have seen in the environment.
  • Tell your students that they will be learning about the physical and chemical changes and properties of matter.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (30 minutes)

  • Pass out the What's the Matter worksheet to your students.
  • Go over the changes and properties with your students.
  • Explain each change and property to your students with an example.
  • An example of a physical change would be shape. You can explain that shape is a physical property. For example, a rectangle can be broken down into triangles, but it would still contain the same amount of mass.
  • Go over and explain the physical and chemical changes to your students on page 2 in the What's the Matter packet.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (40 minutes)

  • Conduct the experiment on the second page of the What's the Matter packet.
  • Ask your students to answer the questions about the experiment on the What's the Matter worksheet with a partner.
  • Go over the questions as a class.

Independent Working Time (10 minutes)

  • Ask your students to write the definition of each word on page 4 of the packet.

Extend

Differentiation

Enrichment

  • Ask your students to write a paragraph explaining why the metabolism of food is a chemical change. Have them research the metabolism of food before writing the paragraph.

Support

  • Show your students one example of a physical change and one example of a chemical change through a drawing. An example could be fireworks for a chemical change and cutting a paper for a physical change.

Review

Assessment (10 minutes)

  • Ask your students to complete the Chemical vs. Physical Properties worksheet.

Review and Closing (20 minutes)

  • Ask your students to pick an object. Have them think of a physical change or chemical change that the object could go through. Instruct your students to write two properties that would change as a result of the change.
  • Ask your students to share what they wrote with the class.

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