Lesson Plan:

Details! Details! Details!

4.5 based on 4 ratings
Download lesson plan
Click to find similar content by grade, subject, or standard.
November 11, 2015
by Bruce Cabell

Learning Objectives

Students will create an illustration that will tell a story for their audience.

Lesson

Introduction (5 minutes)

  • Gather students on the carpet.
  • Tell students that they will learn how to draw an illustration with color and details today. Tell your students about how illustrations can tell wonderful stories without words.
  • Ask students what a detail is. Tell them that a detail is a small piece of information that, when used correctly can add a lot to a story.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (20 minutes)

  • Hang a poster sized version of the Rubric for Illustrations for students to view. Projecting the document using an interactive whiteboard or overhead is also an option.
  • Introduce the rubric and illustrations. Read the criteria under numbers 1, 2, and 3 and refer to the corresponding illustration.
  • Share how one illustration tells more of a story than another. Explain how the color and small details make a huge difference.
  • Compare illustrations number 1, 2, and 3.
  • Once completed, hang a large piece of white paper. Divide it into three sections. In the first section, draw a stick figure with no color. In the second section, draw a picture of a person, with little color. In the third section, draw a person with as many small or specific details as possible with lots of color.
  • Tell students which illustration is a number 1, 2, and 3 and why.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (15 minutes)

  • Hang a large piece of white paper. Divide it into two sections. Draw two homes depicting number 1 on the rubric.
  • Tell students the two homes are an example of a number 1 on the rubric. Next, choose a student to add color and details to the first home, so it depicts a number 3 on the rubric. Some guidance may be needed here, so have student refer to the rubric. When completed, discuss.
  • Then, choose another student to add color and details to the second home, so it depicts a number 3 on the rubric. When completed, discuss.

Independent Working Time (20 minutes)

  • Before working independently, ask students if they understand the Rubric for Illustrations.
  • Pass out a blank piece of white paper and rubric to each student. Tell students that they are going to draw a picture of you and ask them to add as much color and detail as possible, so it depicts a number 3 on the rubric.
  • Instruct your students to walk back to their desks. Tell them to take out a pencil and crayons and begin.

Extend

Differentiation

  • Enrichment: Advanced students can be encouraged to put the teacher in a setting such as the classroom. Specific details of the classroom should be included.
  • Support: Students who need direction and support can be paired with a student who shows strength in illustrating. In addition, give each struggling student an illustration where the body of the teacher is drawn for them. Furthermore, give a copy of visuals that can be included in the teacher drawing. For example, color of eyes, hair, and skin, type of dress, pants, shoes, etc.

Review

Assessment

  • As students are working independently, walk around and check in with each student. Observe if students are using the rubric and if the process of illustrating is easy or difficult for them.
  • Record observations. Is their illustration accurate? Are they using the right colors and details?
  • If additional time is needed for assessment, make observations and notes during review and closing.

Review and Closing (10 minutes)

  • Divide class into pairs or groups of 3. Each will share their illustration. Students can practice scoring the illustration as a 1, 2, or 3.
  • Select 3 students to share their illustrations with the class. Have the audience score the illustration and explain why.
  • To end the lesson, ask students what they have to include in an illustration to tell a wonderful story for their audience.

How likely are you to recommend Education.com to your friends and colleagues?

Not at all likely
Extremely likely