Lesson Plan:

Fairy Tales: Identifying Story Elements

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June 24, 2015
by Sarah Marten

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to identify the following elements of a fiction text: title, author, character, setting, problem, and solution.

Lesson

Introduction (5 minutes)

  • Begin this lesson by having the following headings written on the dry erase board: title, author, characters, setting, problem, and solution. Alternatively, project the Fairy Tale Organizer onto the wall or whiteboard.
  • Review the definitions of the terms written or projected in the classroom.
  • Tell your students they are going to use their knowledge of story elements to create classroom posters. Remind the class that story elements are the fundamental parts of a story. For example, the setting is where the story takes place.
  • Ask the students to think about the story elements of a common fairy tale, such as Cinderella.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (15 minutes)

  • Using the dry erase board, or projected organizer, ask students to recall the story elements from Cinderella. Call on volunteers until all of the elements have been identified and written on board or typed into projected organizer.
  • Pass out the copies of the Fairy Tale Organizer.
  • Arrange students into groups or pairs.
  • Explain to your students that they will be reading a fairy tale of their choice in their group (or pair). Encourage students to use the Famous Fairy Tales worksheet set to choose a story.
  • Have each pair or group of students read the title and briefly summarize each story.
  • Organize a plan to have students select and collect the fairy tale they want to read in their group or pair.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (25 minutes)

  • Make sure each student has a copy of the Fairy Tale Organizer and a fairy tale in their groups or pairs.
  • Instruct students to take turns reading the fairy tale aloud in their group or pair.
  • Before the students start reading, explain that they will fill out the Fairy Tale Organizer once they have completely finished reading their chosen fairy tale.
  • Walk around the room and monitor groups as they are reading to ensure that each student is taking a turn at reading aloud.
  • As your students finish reading, monitor the groups as they complete the Fairy Tale Organizer.
  • Once all of your students have completed the Fairy Tale Organizer, direct their attention back to you.
  • Explain to the class that they will be creating a poster displaying the story elements that they identified in their organizer as a group or pair. To help your students better understand each story element, consider having a model Fairy Tale Organizer created ahead of time for the fairy tale used to introduce this lesson.

Independent Working Time (15 minutes)

  • Explain to the students that all the information on the organizer must be represented on the poster in some way.
  • Encourage students to use drawings and bright colors to create their poster. Have your students use pencils to sketch out their poster elements. Approve each student's sketch before he colors it in.
  • Monitor your students as they create their posters.

Extend

Differentiation

  • Enrichment: Ask students who need a greater challenge to complete the Fairy Tale Organizer for an additional story.
  • Support: Arrange students who need support into a small group to complete the Fairy Tale Organizer together. Ask each student to make their own poster.

Technology Integration

Review

Assessment (5 minutes)

  • Assess your students' understanding of story elements by reviewing their completed posters. For a more formal assessment, have your students identify all of the story elements after independently reading their chosen fairy tales.

Review and Closing (5 minutes)

  • Wrap up the lesson by asking your class to recall and identify the story elements of any fiction, or make-believe, text.
  • Reference the posters after reading stories as a class. This will help strengthen your students' understanding of the parts of a story.

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