Football Word Families

  • Kindergarten
  • Reading
  • 65 minutes
  • Standards: RF.K.3, RF.K.3.A
  • no ratings yet
November 12, 2015
by Chris Herman

Categorize words by their ending sounds using a fun-filled football theme. Your students will complete various word sorts and write down words to emphasize the principles of rhyming.

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to identify words that rhyme.

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Lesson

Introduction (10 minutes)

  • Have students stand in a circle, showing them a football. Instruct them to clap out the two syllables foot-ball to gain a better phonological understanding of the word.
  • Encourage all students to put both their arms out in front of them with their palms facing up towards the sky.
  • Tell them to catch the ball with their hands and bring the football towards their body.
  • Go around the circle, allowing every student to catch the ball once.
  • As they are waiting, ask your students to cheer for their classmates by clapping to the syllables of their name. For example, when it is Treyshon's turn, have all the students chant Trey-shon, Trey-shon, Trey-shon.
  • Once the student catches the ball, have all the other students give a round of applause to encourage them as they get a touchdown.
  • Once everyone has a turn making a catch, have all students clap out the syllables for the word touchdown.
  • Now, tell students that since they are familiar with big words like football and touchdown, they are going to learn about words that rhyme, or words that have the same ending sound.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (15 minutes)

  • Use a poster with mini footballs to model words that rhyme. Underline and emphasize the final letters of a word so that students begin to understand ending sounds for this lesson.
  • Invite students to the board to begin and sort words with familiar endings such as -at, -ug, and -in.
  • Invite one student to the board to sort the following -ug words: rug, bug, and mug.
  • Repeat the same process with the -in word family using the words win, bin, and tin. Follow the same process with cat, hat, and bat.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (10 minutes)

  • Use ending sounds to match words with pictures, one word at a time, displayed in front of the group.
  • Show the ending sounds /in/ /at/, and /ug/, and model how to match the word hat with the word cat because of the final sound it makes.

Independent Working Time (10 minutes)

  • Have students write down words from the board one at a time.
  • Using three different colors, have them highlight words that rhyme and are part of the same football word family. For example, instruct them to highlight all -at words with the color yellow.

Extend

Differentiation

  • Enrichment: Students who complete all of the word families can have the opportunity to match various words with their corresponding pictures. This can be completed using picture printouts of all the words used in the lesson.
  • Support: For students who are not yet familiar with ending sounds and are still working on beginning sounds, have them complete a modified version using beginning sounds only. For example, rug and rat would both be categorized as part of the /r/ family.

Related Books and/or Media

Review

Assessment (10 minutes)

  • Using sheets of written words at the end of activity, track the correct amount of rhymes in word families that each student is able to identify.
  • For students completing the modified version with beginning sounds, record the number of beginning sounds they are able to sort correctly.
  • For students who complete all word families correctly, record the amount of words they can correctly match to the corresponding picture.

Review and Closing (10 minutes)

  • For "extra points," place duct tape on the board as goalposts.
  • Have students tape pictures in between the goalposts as other students tape the corresponding word next to each picture. Give one point as a reward for placing a picture of a cat next to the word cat.
  • Extra points can also be awarded for grouping the word families together.

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