Lesson Plan:

G or PG? Persuade Me!

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July 22, 2015
by Sabrina LeBlond

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to introduce a topic by stating an opinion and create an organizational structure to provide reasons that support their opinion. Students will utilize linking words to connect their opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement.


Introduction (8 minutes)

  • Introduce a fictional scenario that centers around the class watching an animated movie.
  • Explain to students that they can only watch an animated movie. Give students the definition of animated, a style of film that uses sequential drawings to create motion.
  • Ask students to brainstorm as many animated movies as they can in five minutes and to make a list on their sheet of paper.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (12 minutes)

  • After five minutes, ask students to share a few movie titles from their brainstorm and list them on the board.
  • Set a time limit of about five minutes, as the list can be lengthy. Include some titles of your own.
  • Next, after presenting the given set of movie titles, explain to students that the school only allows G-rated movies to be shown. Ask students to identify which movies are rated PG.
  • As students identify the PG-rated movies, cross them off the board. For movie titles that the class is unsure about, do an online search or designate a student do one for the class.
  • Continue identifying PG-rated movies, and the list will begin to shrink until only a few movie titles will remain.
  • Ask students how they feel about the remaining movie titles and why they think these movies are acceptable to show to the class.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that you value their opinions. Let them know that they will have an opportunity to voice their opinions, and work to persuade others to allow either PG-rated movies or only G-rated movies in school.
  • Show students the Persuasive Writing organizer and review the sections with them.
  • Tell students that they will complete the organizer to persuade others to agree with their views on either G or PG-rated movies.
  • Model for students how to complete the organizer. Show where they should state their opinion and show an example.
  • Next, show students how to select linking words on the organizer. Instruct students to circle a linking, or transition, word from a given list before stating their supporting reasons.
  • Demonstrate for the class how to restate the topic sentence in order to provide a concluding sentence.

Independent Working Time (15 minutes)

  • Allow students to work independently on their organizers.
  • Remind students to write reasons that would help persuade others to agree with them, and to be prepared to share.
  • Display teacher example for students to refer to.



  • Enrichment: For students who need an extra challenge, ask them to state four reasons to support their opinion and provide personal examples. Students may also utilize their own linking or transition words.
  • Support: For students who need support, provide sentence starters to assist in writing the opinion and supporting reasons. If necessary, reduce the assignment to state two reasons instead of three.


Assessment (10 minutes)

  • To check for student understanding, monitor the classroom as students are working.
  • Collect the persuasive writing organizers at the end of the lesson to review.

Review and Closing (10 minutes)

  • Call on student volunteers to share their organizers with the class.
  • Ask students to share positive feedback about their classmates’ persuasive organizer.
  • Ask students if they think their opinions have changed after hearing from their classmates.
  • Assign the Make it Happen worksheet as a writing homework assignment.

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