Healthy Adventures: Practicing Syllables

  • Kindergarten
  • Reading
  • 65 minutes
  • Standards: RF.K.2
  • no ratings yet
November 13, 2015
by Chris Herman

Clap along to pictures of vegetable-themed cartoons as your students learn about phonological awareness. Get ready to "chop" up words as you prepare them to be served.

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to correctly identify the amount of syllables in multiple words.

Download Lesson Plan

Lesson

Introduction (10 minutes)

  • Begin the lesson by discussing syllables, or a section of a word with one vowel sound. Use classroom examples such as pen-cil and pa-per, and have the students clap out these words together (one syllable per clap).
  • As a group, have students jump one at a time for every syllable in their name. For example, Juliana would jump four times.
  • Have each student select a vegetable to keep in their minds.
  • Sing the "Jump Up and Down" song with one student in the middle, jumping up and down. Direct the middle student to sing a song. For example: If your name is carrot, jump up and down, jump up and down, jump up and down. If your name is carrot, jump up and down, now sit right back down.
  • If the students chose a carrot, have them sit down. Repeat this song a few times with several different people in the middle singing about different vegetables.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (10 minutes)

  • Get a big bowl or bin with plastic or real vegetables. Pull out an ear of corn as the first example. Ask students to identify the number of syllables in the word corn.
  • Have everyone clap once together as they say the word corn. Emphasize that they clapped once because corn only has one syllable.
  • Now have students "chop" out the syllables on their arm as they say each syllable for the following words: peas, carrots, and tomatoes.
  • Encourage your students to pretend that they are "chopping" the vegetables onto a cutting board so they can prepare them for a meal.
  • Instruct students to, one at a time, pretend to place vegetables from the cutting board onto an imaginary plate in the middle of the circle.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (10 minutes)

  • Use the Vegetables Coloring Page to model how to color the correct way.
  • Demonstrate how to color in the pictures of vegetables. As you color, have students point out what you are doing right, such as coloring in between the lines, sharing crayons, keeping crayons on the table, etc.
  • Have students who are sitting quietly come up to emulate what you are doing and help color in the picture. Display in the background for students to see when finished.

Independent Working Time (15 minutes)

  • Direct your students to color their own Vegetables Coloring Pages.
  • After they have colored, give them the Vegetable Syllables worksheet to complete.

Extend

Differentiation

  • Enrichment: Students who finish their packets can use the plastic or real vegetables to draw their own versions of the vegetables on additional pieces of construction paper. Encourage them to write the names of the vegetables, preferably by sounding them out with your guidance.
  • Support: Students who struggle to color or draw different vegetables on their own can focus on basic shapes and line tracing (such as circles, ovals, and rectangles). Give your students the correct number of dots per syllable so that they can match them.

Related Books and/or Media

Review

Assessment (10 minutes)

  • Collect the Vegetable Syllables worksheet, assessing your students' understanding of syllables and ability to identify them.

Review and Closing (10 minutes)

  • Have students volunteer to share their coloring pages (including the cartoons from the Vegetable Syllables worksheet), choosing their favorite one to show the rest of their class.
  • Go around the circle so that everybody who would like a turn can share.
  • Ask your students to review the vegetables they learned. Potential discussion questions include: What does the vegetable look like? How many syllables are in the word?

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