How Many Humps?

May 19, 2015
by Rose McCabe

Increase your students' self-confidence while practicing pre-reading skills, number recognition and counting to five. Students will read about Sally the Camel and count the humps on her back.

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to count and recognize numbers one through five. Students will be able to retell a story through song.

Download Lesson Plan

Lesson

Introduction (10 minutes)

  1. Introduce the activity by showing the camel hair sweater. Tell the students that you have a part of the camel with you. Ask students what part of the camel they think you have. Have students volunteer answers.
  2. Let the students know that you have a sweater made of a camel's hair. Have the students feel the sweater. Ask them how it feels.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (30 minutes)

  • Tell the students that a camel's hair is collected when it sheds. Ask students to guess what the word "shed" means. Have students volunteer answers before giving the definition.
  • Let students know that shed camel hair is picked up and made into sweaters for people to wear.
  • Ask students about other animals who might shed. This includes humans, dogs, cats, and more.
  • Show Camel by Caroline Arnold to students. Let them know that this book takes place in the desert.
  • Ask the students if they know what a desert is. Listen to responses before giving a definition.
  • Do a picture walk through the book. Show the students that the camels live in the desert. You can also show students the Sahara Desert in Northern Africa on a map or globe.
  • Tell the students a few facts about camels. Explain that camels usually carry heavy objects for people who live in the desert. Explain that camels have one or two humps on their backs.
  • Tell students that camels are herbivores or animals that only eat plants. See if they can think of any other animals that only eat plants. Ask them if people are herbivores.
  • Look at a few pictures in the book with the class and have students count humps on the camels with you.
  • Present a picture of a horse to the class. Ask students what camels and horses have in common. Ask students if they know what makes the animals different. Try to lead them towards seeing that camels always have humps.
  • Read the book with the class.
  • Let students know that you have a very special camel for them to meet. Introduce Sally the Camel by holding up the booklet of the same name.
  • Ask students what makes Sally different from other camels. Show her five humps and count them along with the class.
  • Sing the "Sally the Camel" song, subtracting one hump each time you turn the page and sing the next verse. When you get down to no humps, turn the page and sing, "Because, Sally is a horse, of course!"

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (20 minutes)

  • Let students know that you have a very special camel for them to meet. Introduce Sally the Camel by holding up the booklet of the same name.
  • Ask students what makes Sally different from other camels. Show her five humps and count them along with the class.
  • Sing the "Sally the Camel" song, subtracting one hump each time you turn the page and sing the next verse. When you get down to no humps, turn the page and sing, "Because, Sally is a horse, of course!"

Independent Working Time (10 minutes)

  • Pass "Sally the Camel" booklets out to students. Invite them to color their bookelts.
  • As the children are coloring their booklets, encourage them to sing the song along with their booklets.
  • Circulate among students and encourage students to count the humps on Sally on any given page while noticing the corresponding numeral on the page.
  • While some children may get done before others, give them number cards 1-5 and a bowl full of manipulatives—ask them to put the correct number of manipulatives on each number.

Extend

Differentiation

  • Enrichment: Advanced students can work with number cards after the main activity. Have them order cards and work with manipulatives.
  • Support: For students who need a little extra help, being paired with a student who has a greater understanding of numbers can offer the opportunity for peer assistance/scaffolding.

Related Books and/or Media

Review

Assessment (10 minutes)

  • Assess what the students have learned by asking open-ended questions before and after reading the book.

Review and Closing (10 minutes)

  • Have students get their booklets and sing the song with the class while they turn the pages of their own booklet.
  • Tell the students that they can take the booklet home and read it with their family.

Teacher Tips

Comments

How likely are you to recommend Education.com to your friends and colleagues?

Not at all likely
Extremely likely