Lesson Plan:

I Have, Who Has? Sight Word Practice

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July 9, 2015
by April Brown

Learning Objectives

Students will recognize basic sight words. Students will read basic sight words fluently.


Introduction (5 minutes)

  • Begin your lesson by explaining to your students that they will be playing a fun game to help them build their reading fluency. Remind them that fluency is how fast or slow someone reads, and that having good reading fluency will help them become better readers.
  • Explain that when your students can recognize sight words that are common but hard to sound out, they improve their reading fluency.
  • Ask your students what sight words they have seen. Possible answers can include words from the Pre-Primer Dolch list: blue, make, look, etc.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (10 minutes)

Prior to beginning the lesson, be sure that each group's I Have, Who Has cards have been cut out and placed in a sandwich bag. There should be a set for you to model with as well.

  • Take your I Have, Who Has game cards out of the sandwich bag.
  • As you go through the following steps, write them on the board so your students can reference them later.
  • Choose two students to model the game.
  • Shuffle the cards and pass one card at a time to the two students until there are no cards left.
  • Put the two students' names in alphabetical order on the board. The student with the name at the beginning of the alphabet goes first.
  • Have everyone lay out their cards so that both students can see them.
  • Have the first person read her card as follows: I have (black word). Who has (red word)? For example, the first person might say: I have play. Who has red?
  • Then, have the person who has red on his card read the card. For example, I have red. Who has run?
  • Have the two students go back and forth with their cards three times each.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (10 minutes)

  • Explain to your students that a practice group of students will continue to play a few rounds. This will be a model for how the game will be played without your explicit instruction.
  • Bring three more students up to create a group of five. Ask the students to re-shuffle the cards.
  • Put all of the students' names on the board, and show them how to put the names in alphabetical order by looking at the first letter of each name and moving on to the second or third letter if necessary.
  • Once you figure out which student will go first, ask your students to lay out the cards in front of them.
  • Prompt them to begin, and help the first student read the card correctly.
  • Allow your students to continue for a few minutes so that the other students can understand how to play the game.

Independent Working Time (20 minutes)

  • Tell your students that they will be playing in groups for the next twenty minutes.
  • Assign students into groups of five, or have them self-assemble into groups.
  • Have them raise their hands for help or refer to the whiteboard for directions. Let the class know that they should re-shuffle the cards and play again if they finish early.



  • Enrichment: If a student needs a challenge, give her a timer, and have her time how long it takes her group to finish reading all the words until the group gets back to the first word. Tell the student that she should encourage her group to read at a quicker pace and “beat” the first score! Give the student a small whiteboard and whiteboard marker to record the data.
  • Support: If a student is struggling, have the whole group say the word aloud together each time.


Assessment (5 minutes)

  • During the lesson, move around the room to check for reading fluency. Check for students who are struggling to read the sight words.

Review and Closing (5 minutes)

  • Have your students bring their attention back to you.
  • Ask your students to clean up their supplies by putting the cards back in the sandwich bags.
  • Bring them together in one big group, and allow them to share their successes from playing the game and discuss why it is important to learn their sight words. Possible discussion questions include: What happens when you do not recognize a sight word? What happens when you can quickly read a sight word?
  • Encourage your students to continue practicing sight words to improve their reading fluency.

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