Lesson Plan:

I See Long E!

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August 5, 2015
by Anna Parrish

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to recognize different word families that include long E words. Students will be able to read and recognize words with the long E spellings of -ee, -ea, and -y.

Lesson

Introduction (5 minutes)

  • Explain that words with a long E sound like the letter name.
  • Invite students to begin brainstorming words that have the long E sound.
  • Write the words on the chart paper in list form as the students say them.
  • Add your own words to the list so that there are samples of three long E spellings: -ee, -ea, and -y.
  • Tell the students that they will be finding words with different spellings of long E.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (5 minutes)

  • Using the list of words that your students just generated, tell them that you will now be looking for the long E spellings inside of the long E words.
  • Model the process of finding the long E spelling inside each word.
  • Using a marker or crayon, underline or draw a circle around the spelling (-ee, -ea, or -y) inside of each word.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (5 minutes)

  • To help students further differentiate between long E spellings, have them participate in an activity to sort words.
  • Distribute word sort cards among students so that each student or pair of students gets a word.
  • Display the Long Vowel E worksheet, and then ask them to look for the place where their word fits.
  • As they show the word, write the word in the correct column, either using an interactive whiteboard or using a hard copy of the PDF file.

Independent Working Time (10 minutes)

  • Distribute the Word Search E worksheet.
  • Direct students to look for any long E words that they can find and circle them.
  • Model the process by displaying the worksheet on an interactive whiteboard and circling the first word.
  • For students who struggle, show them the first letter or two letters of a word, and have them then find or circle the word.

Extend

Differentiation

  • Enrichment: Give each student a blank word search grid. Challenge your students to create their own word finds with long E words and trade with a partner.
  • Support: Modify the Word Search E worksheet by underlining the first letter of each word so that students can find the word more easily. Underline the long E spellings to prompt the students or simply have the students color-code the long E spellings. For example, the letters “ea” in a word could be written in red, while the remainder of the letters are blue. Have the students complete the -eep worksheet if they struggle with the comprehension component of some -ee words.

Technology Integration

  • Have the students use digital products to create their own flashcards or word search digitally, using either a tablet or a publishing program.
  • Ask your students to go on a long E scavenger hunt around the classroom and take pictures of words that contain long E.

Related Books and/or Media

  • Wheels! by Annie Cobb
  • Sleepy Dog by Harriet Ziefert
  • Me Hungry! by Jeremy Tankard
  • Sheep in a Jeep by Nancy E. Shaw
  • The Bee Tree by Patricia Polacco
  • Who Has These Feet? by Laura Hulbert
  • Fancy Nancy by Jane O'Connor
  • GAME: Long and Short Vowel Sort

Review

Assessment (5 minutes)

  • Using flash cards from the guided practice part of the lesson, have students point to 3 different words: one word that has -ee, one words that has -ea, and one word that has -y. Have the students read the three words.
  • Alternatively, show several cards again to the entire class, having them identify the spelling patterns.

Review and Closing (5 minutes)

  • Display the Long E Sound worksheet, or print it off and display it in the front of the room.
  • Invite students to say the words and find the long E picture.
  • Once the students have found the long E picture, invite them to spell the word with you as you write the word on a dry erase board.

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