Lesson Plan:

It's Piggy Time!

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August 22, 2015
by Rose McCabe

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to retell and act out a story in the correct sequence.

Lesson

Introduction (15 minutes)

  • Show the students the straw, sticks, and brick. Allow them to touch these items.
  • Explain to the students that something that is very strong is sturdy. Show them the concept word strip.
  • Step on the step stool. Tell the students you can step on it and it doesn’t break because it is sturdy.
  • Ask the students what will happen when you step on the disposable plastic cup? Step on it. It is not sturdy and breaks.
  • As the students are examining the straw, sticks, and brick, ask them which of the three materials they think would be the most sturdy.
  • Ask the students if they know what a chimney is.
  • Explain that a chimney is a long tunnel-like opening that goes from a fire place in a home and leads to the top of the house. Smoke from the fire can go up the tunnel and to the outside so smoke doesn’t go into the house. Show them the concept word strip.
  • Ask the students if they know the story of the The Three Little Pigs. Listen to what they have to say.
  • Explain to them that the wolf is a carnivore. A carnivore is a meat-eater, which is why he wants to eat the three little pigs. Show the concept word strip.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (30 minutes)

  • Read aloud The Three Little Pigs.
  • Discuss the story. Ask students how they thought the pigs felt when the wolf blew down their houses.
  • Ask why they thought the wolf was being so mean to the little pigs. Ask where they thought the little pigs' mother was? These are open-ended questions with no right or wrong answer. These questions are encouraging the students to think.
  • Explain to the students that they are going to act out the story. Show them the three pretend houses you have made (see reference image).
  • Review that the one with yellow strips of paper is the straw house, the one with brown strips of paper is the stick house, and the one with red rectangle papers is the brick house.
  • Choose three children: one to hold the straw house, one to hold the stick house, and one to hold the brick house. Stand them in a line.
  • Choose one child to be the wolf.
  • Have the wolf say, “Little pig little pig let me come in.”
  • Have the first pig of the straw house say, “Not by the hair on my chinny chin chin.”
  • Have the wolf say, “Then I’ll huff and puff and blow your house down!”
  • Have the wolf pretend to blow. Have the straw house fall to the floor as the straw house child runs behind the stick house child.
  • Repeat this scenario with the stick house child.
  • Have both the stick and straw house children run behind the brick house child. Repeat the scenario with the brick house child.
  • When the wolf cannot blow down the brick house, have him pretend to go down the chimney of the brick house.
  • Have the wolf lands in the pretend pot of hot water and run away.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (10 minutes)

  • As the children are acting out the story, help them with the dialogue as needed.
  • Allow all the children to take turns with the different characters.

Independent Working Time (20 minutes)

  • Have the students work on the two sheets from Education.com. Have them cut out the storyboard pictures and put them in the correct order by gluing them onto a strip of paper.
  • Have them cut out the finger puppets and pretend to act out the story at the table with a friend.

Extend

Differentiation

  • Enrichment: For children who need more of a challenge, have them complete the Three Little Pigs Vocabulary worksheet.
  • Support: Pair struggling students with children who have a greater understanding and give them any guidance they may require.

Review

Assessment (10 minutes)

  • As the children are acting out the story and working on their sheets, observe and write down any notes as needed.

Review and Closing (15 minutes)

  • Ask the students what their favorite part of the lesson was.
  • Tell the students that you will leave out the houses, wolf, and pot for some free play, so anyone can enjoy acting out the story.

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