Lesson Plan:

Leafy Rhymes

no ratings yet
Download lesson plan
Click to find similar content by grade, subject, or standard.
July 22, 2015
by Anna Parrish

Learning Objectives

Students will manipulate and exchange letters to form one-syllable words. Students will be able to recognize the flexible uses of letters to create similar words. Students will create words utilizing parts of rhyming words.

Lesson

Introduction (5 minutes)

  • Begin with the game "I Spy Two Words that are Alike." Invite your students to sit in a semi-circle and place the words in the center.
  • If your students are unfamiliar with the game "I Spy," briefly explain what the word spy means, modeling the action of looking. Invite your students to "spy" the words that are alike.
  • Your students might initially notice that the beginning letters are alike. Tell your students that those words have beginning letters that are alike, but today's focus will be on words that have the same ending sounds, or words that rhyme.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (5 minutes)

  • In a small group or as a whole group, ask your students to name the first two letters of the Teacher Modeling cards (S and M).
  • Model the process of blending the sounds in the word cat as shown on the Teacher Modeling card.
  • Tell your students that they are going to "magically" make a new word. Cover the letter C in cat with one of the other letters—S or M. For example, the word cat will become sat or mat.
  • Model the blending of the word. Invite your students to blend the word with you.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (10 minutes)

  • Explain to your students that they will practice making "magical" words on their own.
  • Give each student or group of students a set of the student manipulative cards. Students may work in pairs, small groups, or independently.
  • Instruct your students to practice creating words with the cards and blending them aloud.

Independent Working Time (30 minutes)

  • Explain to your students that they will have a chance to make a tree with some of the new words they created.
  • Show an example of the finished product.
  • Have your students create leaves with a different rhyming word on each leaf. A template is provided for the students to trace, or they can create their own.
  • On the trunk, have the students write the rhyme that is the same for all of the words on the tree. For example, a tree with the leaf words cat, bat, and mat would have the rhyme "at" on the trunk.

Extend

Differentiation

  • Enrichment: Have your students create sentences with the words that they have just written. These sentences can be included as part of the artwork.
  • Support: Provide students with a limited number of choices to create the words, rather than giving them the whole set of letters and rhymes. For example, give a student cards with the letters at, S, and M to create individual words. Then, give the student a different rhyming set to create different words.

Technology Integration

  • Using SMART Board software, display a mixture of words that rhyme and don't rhyme. Have your students move words that rhyme together on the board.

Related Books and/or Media

  • How Big is a Pig? by Clare Beaton and Stella Blackstone
  • There's a Wocket in My Pocket by Dr. Seuss

Review

Assessment (15 minutes)

  • Using the student manipulatives, ask your students to form three to five different words. Have them read the words aloud to you.
  • Ask your students to point to the words that they formed on their trees and to blend the letters into words aloud.
  • Show your students a word and ask if it is a rhyme. For example: What happens if I change the letter H in hat to a B? Is the new word a rhyme?
  • Have your students blend the new word and say the final word aloud. Record their progress on a generic class recording sheet.

Review and Closing (5 minutes)

  • Play "I Spy Words that Rhyme" with the class. Point out that it's a similar game with a different name. Invite all of your students to bring their finished work (rhyming trees) to a central meeting place where everyone can sit in a circle.
  • Ask your students to share their rhymes, and invite them to "spy" the rhymes of other students that rhyme with their own words. For example, if Sally wrote the word hat on her tree and Arthur wrote the word cat on his tree, Sally would "spy" Arthur's rhyming word cat.

How likely are you to recommend Education.com to your friends and colleagues?

Not at all likely
Extremely likely