Lesson Plan:

Reading the Clues, Understanding Plot Lesson Part II

5.0 based on 1 rating
Download lesson plan
Click to find similar content by grade, subject, or standard.
Grade
Standards
November 4, 2015
by Elizabeth S. Tyree

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to use context clues to identify and describe conflict and genre.

Lesson

Introduction (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to get out their pencils and Reading Like a Writer, Writing like a Reader workbooks.
  • Tell students that today they are going to be learning how to read context clues to discover genre and conflict.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (10 minutes)

  • Tell students to turn to page 7 of their workbooks titled It's All About Conflict.
  • Read the top half of the page with your students, discussing to answer any questions or comments they may have.
  • Answer the first question as a class.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (5 minutes)

  • Instruct students to complete the other 3 conflict questions as you walk around the classroom, checking for comprehension as you go.

Independent Working Time (15 minutes)

  • Ask students to complete page 8, titled What Genre is This? on their own.

Extend

Differentiation

  • Enrichment: Students in need of a challenge may be allowed to write their own book summaries, like the conflict page, and allow other students to guess book and type of conflict.
  • SUPPORT: Students in need of support may be allowed to work in small groups or be partners with a peer tutor. Students in need of support may be given small group or one-on-one time with their teacher.

Review

Assessment (5 minutes)

  • Students will turn in these two workbook pages for a grade.

Review and Closing (5 minutes)

  • Instruct students to put away their workbooks.
  • Review the types of genre and conflict they have just worked with.
  • Ask students a reflection question before ending the lesson. Examples of this question are: What type of conflict is happening in the book you're reading right now? Why do you think that some books have more than one type of conflict? Sometimes books can be more than one genre. Why do you think that is?

How likely are you to recommend Education.com to your friends and colleagues?

Not at all likely
Extremely likely