Lesson Plan:

Sequencing: Order in the Court!

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March 7, 2016
by Nekeisha Hall

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to identify the correct sequence of events in a story.


Introduction (20 minutes)

  • Give students sentence strips from The Little Red Hen.
  • Instruct the students to pay attention as you read the story. Make sure they pay attention to the story sequence.
  • After you are finished reading the story, have your students put the sentence strips in order. Students should work together to determine which part of the story they have.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that they just sequenced a story, or put it in the correct order.
  • To help them practice, ask some students to share what they did from the time they woke up until the time they arrived at school, making sure to share events in the order they occurred.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (15 minutes)

  • Ask students to give other examples from their everyday lives where sequencing is important. For example, in baking, sequencing can be important.
  • Have students watch The Three Little Pigs.
  • After they have finished watching, instruct them to retell the story in the correct order.

Independent Working Time (30 minutes)

  • Invite your students to role play the characters in the story.
  • Give your students masks from The Three Little Pigs, and have them self-organize the sequence of the story.
  • Then, direct them to act out the story in order.



  • Enrichment: Give students sentences showing the out of order steps to make a dessert, such as marshmallows, and ask them to sequence the steps.
  • Support: Give students the Lunch Time worksheet to complete.


Assessment (5 minutes)

  • In groups, have students spend two or three minutes writing what they learned.
  • Ask at least one student from each group to share what he wrote.
  • Collect the papers for review.

Review and Closing (10 minutes)

  • Ask your students to explain how the story would be different if it had a different sequence.
  • Ask students to share the importance of sequencing in reading and everyday life.
  • Have them give examples.

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