Show It to Know It!

  • First Grade
  • Math
  • 65 minutes
  • Standards: 1.NBT.B.2
  • no ratings yet
July 22, 2015
by April Brown

Help your students understand place value with this hands-on lesson. Using place value cards and interlocking cubes, they'll represent different numbers in a fun, social manner.

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to visually represent ones and tens, as well as understand two-digit values in terms of ones and tens.

Download Lesson Plan

Lesson

Introduction (10 minutes)

  • Invite the students to sit down at their desks.
  • Explain to the students that today they will be learning about place value using two digit numbers.
  • Ask the students to think of a number between 20 and 30.
  • Call on a student to give you a number.
  • Write this number on the board. (Let’s pretend the number is 21.)
  • Say the number out loud.
  • Underline the number 1, and write "ones" underneath it. Underline the number 2, write "tens" underneath it.
  • Explain to the students that today they will learn about place value with groups of ones and tens. They will also learn how to represent the number twenty-one using place value cards.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (10 minutes)

  • Ask the students how many ones there are in the number 21.
  • Point to the number one on the board, and call on a student to answer.
  • Ask the student to come up to the board to pull out one interlocking cube from the tub.
  • Ask the students how many groups of ten there are in the number 21.
  • Call on a student to answer.
  • Ask the student to come up to the board to make two groups of ten with the interlocking cubes. Ask the student to count aloud as she forms the groups of ten.
  • Hold up the two groups of ten for all the students to see.
  • Count by ones up to 20 while you point to each interlocking cube. Then count by tens, pointing to each group of ten (10, 20).
  • Invite the students to stand up.
  • Tell the students that you will show them a special place value movement that will help them to remember their ones and tens.
  • Hold your right arm out in front of you and say "ones," then put your right arm down. Hold your left arm out in front of you and say "tens," then put your left arm down.
  • Repeat this a few times. Invite students to join you.
  • Explain to the students that movement helps us to "lock information in our brains."

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (10 minutes)

  • Ask a student or two to pass out the place value cards.
  • Explain to the students that they will be showing you the number you write on the board using their place value cards.
  • Invite a student to come up to the front of the room to model this for the other students.
  • Ask the student to empty her bag of ones and tens. She should have nine ones cards and nine tens cards.
  • Write a number on the board (let’s pretend the number is 13.).
  • Ask the student to show you how many ones are in the number 13.
  • Ask the student to show you how many tens are in the number thirteen.
  • Count for the students by pointing to the ten card and counting up using the ones cards: 10, 11, 12, 13.
  • Ask the student to sit back down.
  • Write another number on the board.
  • Repeat the previous process with all the students.
  • Explain to the students that next they will work in groups and play the place value game.

Independent Working Time (20 minutes)

  • Split the students into groups of 4-5.
  • Give each group a small whiteboard and a dry erase marker.
  • Choose one number caller for each group (this should be a student who has good number sense up to 100).
  • This student will write a number on the whiteboard and call it out.
  • The other students must show the number with their place value cards.
  • Invite a group to come to the front of the class.
  • Ask them to model the process for the other students.
  • Explain to students that if one member of the group is struggling, the other members may help the student.
  • Students may begin playing the game.

Extend

Differentiation

  • Enrichment: Students who need a challenge can be tasked with recording each of the numbers the number callers call on a piece of scrap paper and putting them in order from least to greatest.
  • Support: Students who need extra support may be paired with peers who can assist them during the place value game. Interlocking cubes should be accessible for these students as well.

Related Books and/or Media

Review

Assessment (5 minutes)

  • Observe students during Guided Practice and Independent Working Time to gauge their understanding of the lesson content.
  • Write down notes regarding students who are struggling and students who grasp the concept well.

Review and Closing (10 minutes)

  • Call the students back together.
  • Ask the students to clean up their place value cards, whiteboards, markers, and any other materials that were out during the lesson.
  • Ask the students to share their successes and areas of struggle from the game.
  • Write a few two-digit numbers on the board. For each number, invite a student to come up to the board and identify which number is in the ones place and which number is in the tens place. Ask a student who remembers the movement that was taught during Explicit Instruction to come up in front of the class and lead a choral chant.

Teacher Tips

Comments

How likely are you to recommend Education.com to your friends and colleagues?

Not at all likely
Extremely likely