Simile vs. Metaphor

  • Fifth Grade
  • Reading, Writing
  • 70 minutes
  • Standards: RL.5.4
  • no ratings yet
August 26, 2015
by Rhondra Lewis

Do your students struggle with similes and metaphors? Do they have trouble identifying the two different types of analogies? This lesson will help simplify the two and put an end to the confusion.

Learning Objectives

Students will understand and recognize the similarities and differences between similes and metaphors.

Download Lesson Plan

Lesson

Introduction (15 minutes)

  • Have students each create a T-chart on lined paper to compare and contrast the similarities and differences between similes and metaphors.
  • Create a T-chart on the board.
  • Have students volunteer to share their thoughts and create a class version of their T-charts.
  • Advise students to add to their charts as needed.
  • Remind students that similes are analogies that compare two things using “like” or “as.” Also remind them that metaphors are analogies that compare two unlike things without using “like” or “as”
  • Explain to students that in this lesson, they will identify and explain the meanings of similes and metaphors and create a writing of their own that uses both.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (10 minutes)

  • Have a student volunteer read the story on the Metaphors and Similes worksheet.
  • Have students identify the similes and metaphors in the story by underlining them and writing them on the spaces provided on the worksheet.
  • Guide students as they identify the examples of each by reminding them that similes use “like or “as” and metaphors do not.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (10 minutes)

  • Have students work in pairs or small groups to complete the Mixed Practice: Similes and Metaphors worksheet.

Independent Working Time (20 minutes)

  • Tell students that this assignment will require them to use these literary devices in their own writing.
  • You can provide students with a topic or allow them to choose their own topics.
  • Have students write a short paper that includes a minimum of five metaphors and five similes.

Extend

Differentiation

  • Enrichment: Allow advanced students to create a product of their choosing that demonstrates their knowledge of the two figurative devices.
  • Support: Have struggling students create a simile vs. metaphor anchor chart as a graphic organizer to be used throughout the lesson. It should remind them of the similarities and differences between the two.

Technology Integration

Related Books and/or Media

Review

Assessment (10 minutes)

  • Review the basic similarities and differences between similes and metaphors again.
  • Have students create a Frayer Model for each of the two terms.

Review and Closing (5 minutes)

  • Have students explain in their own words what they learned today .
  • Allow students to ask questions that they still have.

Teacher Tips

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