Lesson Plan:

States Of Matter: Identifying Solids, Liquids, and Gases

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Grade
Subject
September 12, 2015
by Sanayya Sohail

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to differentiate between a solid, liquid, and gas. Students will be able to give examples of changes in states of matter from heating and cooling.

Lesson

Introduction (5 minutes)

  • Tell your students that they will be learning about the states of matter.
  • Ask them if they know what the 3 states of matter are.
  • List the three states of matter on the board.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (30 minutes)

  • Explain to your students that a solid is something that has a shape and takes up space. Have your students come up with examples, and write them on the board. Offer examples, such as desks, books, and chairs.
  • Remind your students that a liquid is something that doesn't have a shape but takes up space, such as water and juice. Ask your students to come up with examples of liquids. List them on the board.
  • Explain to your students that a gas has no shape and doesn't take space, such as air. Tell your students that air is made of gases, and they can't be seen.
  • Ask your students if a solid can turn into a liquid. Explain that a cube of ice can turn into a liquid with heat. Place a cube of ice in warm water, and have your students observe it for 5 minutes. Show your students how the ice is starting to melt.
  • Ask your students if a liquid can turn into a gas. Place a glass of water in a microwave. Set the microwave to 3 minutes. Take out the cup and show students that the bubbles formed on top of the water consist of gas.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (10 minutes)

  • Ask your students to complete the Solid, Liquid, Gas worksheet with a partner.
  • Go over the worksheet as a class.

Independent Working Time (20 minutes)

  • Ask your students to complete the What is Solid?, What is Liquid?, and What is Gas? worksheets.
  • Go over these worksheets with your students.

Extend

Differentiation

  • Enrichment: Instruct your students to research what would happen to their body without liquids. Have them come up with two facts in their own words. Direct your students to find out the different gases that make up the air and their roles. Ask your students to research and explain 2 things that would happen to the Earth if it weren't solid.
  • Support: Instruct your students to complete the Drawing Solids, Liquids, and Gases worksheet. Help them come up with examples for each state. This worksheet will give students a visual about the three different categories.

Review

Assessment (5 minutes)

  • Ask your students to give an example of a time when a solid can change into a liquid.
  • Have them explain when a liquid can change into a gas.
  • Instruct them to write down the answers on a sheet of paper.

Review and Closing (10 minutes)

  • Go around the class, and ask your students to give an example of a solid and a liquid.
  • Tell your students that for a gas, they can describe a process that consists of releasing gas such as breathing or burping. Alternatively, give an example of a gas found in the air such as oxygen or nitrogen.

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