Storytelling: Identifying Elements in Wonderland

  • First Grade
  • Reading
  • 140 minutes
  • Standards: RL.1.3
  • no ratings yet
September 8, 2015
by Sanayya Sohail

In this lesson, your students will be taken into wonderland by reading familiar stories such as The Ugly Duckling. Your students will identify characters, setting, and main events in these stories.

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to identify the main characters, settings, and events in a story. Students will be able to identify the beginning, middle, and end of a story. Students will be able to identify details in the beginning, middle, and end.

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Lesson

Introduction (10 minutes)

  • Ask students to tell you a narrative style story that involved them or one they heard. For example, have them tell you a story about what they did after school yesterday.
  • After the student is done telling the story, ask other students to identify the people in the story. Potential questions include: Where did it take place? What happened in the beginning, middle, and end?

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (30 minutes)

  • Read The Night Before First Grade to your students.
  • Ask students if they know what the word character means. Explain that characters are the people in a story.
  • Ask them who the characters are in The Night Before First Grade.
  • Write character and setting using a 2 column chart on the board.
  • Ask students if they know what a setting is. Explain that setting is the place where the story occurs.
  • Ask the class the setting of the story, and fill this in the chart.
  • Create 3 bubbles on the board with an additional bubble attached to each bubble. Ask students what happens in the beginning, middle, and end. Fill in the 3 main bubbles.
  • Explain that details help people imagine the main events.
  • Instruct your students to come up with a detail for the beginning, middle, and end. Fill in the attached bubbles.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (40 minutes)

  • Have your students divide their papers into two sections using rulers.
  • Instruct your students to write character in the first box and write the people or animals in the story.
  • Model this on the board.
  • Direct your students to write setting in the box below the first one and write the place where the story takes place.
  • Have your students flip the paper and divide the paper into thirds. Instruct the students to further divide the paper into sixths.
  • Instruct your students to put beginning in the first block and detail in the one next to it. Do this as well for middle and end.
  • Set the timer to 20 minutes.
  • Instruct students to read The Frog Prince worksheet with a partner. After that, fill in the chart.
  • Have your students work together to come up with answers.
  • Read the story out loud and invite students to say the answers they wrote.

Independent Working Time (20 minutes)

  • Instruct students to complete the 5 W's worksheet.
  • Remind students to answer in complete sentences.
  • Set the timer to 15 minutes.
  • Read the text as a class and invite students to come write the answers on the board.

Extend

Differentiation

  • Enrichment: Instruct students to write a story. Ask your students to circle the characters in red and setting in blue. Direct your students to underline details in green and the beginning, middle, and end in purple.
  • Support: Read the Rumpelstiltskin worksheet. Ask students to summarize the story at the end of each paragraph. Have students write and draw the characters and the setting.

Review

Assessment (20 minutes)

  • Instruct students to write the beginning, middle, and end of a story. Direct your students to write about a time when they went to one of these places: zoo, park, museum, library, or water park.
  • Ask your students to write the setting and characters.

Review and Closing (20 minutes)

  • Read the The Ugly Duckling worksheet aloud.
  • Ask students to identify the characters, setting, beginning, middle, end, and details for each.

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