Sweet Math Lesson

  • Preschool, Kindergarten
  • Math
  • 45 minutes
  • Standards: K.CC.C.6
  • 1.0 based on 1 rating
August 21, 2015
by Melody Johnson

This sweet, comprehensive lesson allows your students to count candy pieces and identify who has more, less, or an equal share. Young learners will have a great time while improving their math skills.

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to compare numbers by identifying them as greater than, less than, or equal to each other.

Download Lesson Plan

Lesson

Introduction (5 minutes)

  • Begin the lesson with an introduction to counting, asking questions about students' favorite objects or food. Good discussion questions include: Have you ever had to count something you had, such as candy, toys, or even money? How do you know you have more or less of something?
  • Explain that today, the class will learn about greater than, less than, and equal to.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (10 minutes)

  • Place students into small groups.
  • Give each student a pack of chewy candy.
  • Explain to students that they will not eat or open the packet until you say so.
  • On your chart paper, projector, or interactive white board, display the visual support sheet.
  • Explain to the students the first box is the greater than box where they show an object has more. Greater than means more. To remember the symbol of greater than, have students hold up their right hand. Place a stamp on their right hand.
  • On the interactive white board, show students an example of greater than in the visual support sheet.
  • Show students three packs of chewable candy.
  • Choose a student to assist you in displaying greater than.
  • Show students the greater than sign. Tell students this is the sign to use to show a number is greater. The open part of the sign always “eats” the larger number.
  • Ask students if they had three packs of candy, but you only had one pack, who would have the greater amount? (Remind students greater than means more.)
  • Allow students to answer the question and describe why they think the teacher has more candy.
  • Ask students who has less of the candy packs? (Remind students that less means only a little bit).
  • Show students the less than sign. Explain to students the pointy part of the sign always points to the number that is less.
  • Ask students if they had one pack of candy, but you had three, who would have the lesser amount?
  • Allow students to answer the question and describe why they think the teacher has less candy.
  • Explain to students that there is one more symbol, which is equal. Show the students the equal sign.
  • Explain to students that equal means the same. Ask, "If I give everyone one pack of candy, does everyone have an equal amount?"
  • Ask students to write the number of candy they have in the first box.
  • Explain to students they will first use the visual support sheet that is given.
  • Explain to students the boxes are color coded to show their work in the correct place.
  • The first yellow box is the greater than box. Students will show how many packs of candy their friends have and how many packs they have.
  • Model to students under the purple box an example of greater than, e.g. 5 > 2 , 10 > 3.
  • Model to students under the red box an example of less than, e.g. 3 < 8, 4 < 9, 10 < 20.
  • Model to students under the green box an example of equal to, e.g. 4 = 4, 1 = 1, 8 = 8.
  • Remind students to use their own examples and not the examples shown.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (5 minutes)

  • Give each student a visual support sheet.
  • Pair each student up with a buddy.
  • Tell students to place the appropriate amount of candy in the blank boxes under the numbers they wrote.
  • Tell the students to repeat the process of demonstrating greater than, less than, and equal to on the visual support sheet with a buddy in each separate square box.
  • Each buddy will take turns demonstrating greater than, less than, and equal to. They will also explain why they think that is the answer.
  • Buddies will switch and provide different examples.
  • Remind students that they need to provide their own examples and not the examples of their buddy.
  • Remind students to have the sign pointing to the lower number; the open part should be "eating" the bigger number.
  • Once they’ve finished, ask students to contribute their examples to the class.

Independent Working Time (10 minutes)

  • Give each student a Sweet Treat Math sheet.
  • Tell students to open the small candy packets given earlier.
  • Tell students not to eat the candy, since they will need it later for the lesson.
  • Ask students to use the candy to demonstrate greater than, less than, and equal to.
  • Tell the students to repeat the process of demonstrating greater than, less than, and equal to on the Sweet Treat Math sheet independently.
  • Ask students to write the numbers in the blank boxes.
  • Once they’ve finished, ask students to contribute their examples to the class.

Extend

Differentiation

  • Enrichment: Students who need more of a challenge can use higher numbers to complete the visual support sheet and the Sweet Treat Math sheet.
  • Support: Students that are struggling can each pair up with a peer to complete this activity. Students can use the visual support sheet to assist in recalling the signs for greater than, less than, and equal to. The student support sheet and the sweet treat worksheet provide color coded actions to show where to provide an example of their work.

Technology Integration

Related Books and/or Media

Review

Assessment (10 minutes)

  • Write each student’s name on the assessment checklist in the empty spaces provided.
  • Check the categories that they recognize and complete correctly.
  • Cross out the boxes of the categories the students do not know.

Review and Closing (5 minutes)

  • Have the Sweet Treat Math sheet displayed on the chart paper, projector or interactive whiteboard.
  • Ask students to share an example of greater than with the class.
  • Tell students to follow along by placing the appropriate amount of candy in the blank boxes under the number they wrote in the boxes below.
  • When the student tells the class the entire example, ask another student if they got the same answer and how they came up with the solution to the example.
  • When that student is complete, have another student tell the class one example of less than.
  • Allow that student to give an answer and explain how they came up with that answer.
  • When that student is done, have another student tell the class one example of equal to.
  • Repeat this process with each section until the activity is complete.

Teacher Tips

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