Thumbs Up or Down?: Persuasive Writing

  • First Grade
  • Writing
  • 60 minutes
  • Standards: W.1.1
  • no ratings yet
August 27, 2015
by Linda F. McGrue

Catalina Magdalena Hoopensteiner Wallendiner Hogan Logan Bogan Was Her Name, and students will have a blast writing persuasive sentences about her. This quirky lesson is sure to please young, creative minds.

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to develop persuasive sentences about a specific topic.

Download Lesson Plan

Lesson

Introduction (10 minutes)

  • Read aloud Catalina Magdalena Hoopensteiner Wallendiner Hogan Logan Bogan Was Her Name to the students.
  • Discuss the parts they liked and did not like.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (10 minutes)

  • Tell the students to give you reasons why they did not like certain parts of the story.
  • List them on the chart paper.
  • Read them to the students.
  • Ask the students what can they do to get someone to like the parts of the story they like.
  • Demonstrate for the students what you would do to convince them.
  • I like the story because it was gross when she stuck her finger up her nose.
  • Let other students give reasons for liking the story also.
  • List them on the chart paper.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (10 minutes)

  • Write this sentence on the chart paper: Everyone should like the story _____ because _____.
  • Let the students make suggestions for filling in the blanks.

Independent Working Time (15 minutes)

  • Give the students sheets of writing paper.
  • Instruct them to copy the writing prompt from the board.
  • Circulate the room to be sure the students have left enough space to write their answers.
  • Tell the students they are to write one reason why someone should like the story about Catalina Magdalena.

Extend

Differentiation

  • Enrichment: Advanced students can write multiple sentences of persuasion.
  • Support: Let struggling students dictate their sentence to you. Write it on a sheet of paper for them to copy.

Review

Assessment (5 minutes)

  • Collect the papers. Check to see who wrote a sentence that makes sense and could persuade someone to change their mind about the story.
  • Reteach for those who need further assistance.

Review and Closing (10 minutes)

  • Read the story again.
  • Read aloud some students' responses.
  • Poll the students to see if any of them were persuaded to change their minds.

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