Time, Money, and Temperature

September 2, 2015
by Margie Morrissey

Let your students show off what they've learned about time, money, and temperature with this lesson that combines all three in one word story.

Learning Objectives

Students will demonstrate what has been learned about time, temperature, and money.

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Lesson

Introduction (5 minutes)

  • Review with children the different objects and materials used to tell time, measure temperature, and make different monetary amounts.
  • Ask your class how these objects (clocks, thermometers, and coins) are used to measure these different thing. Ask students what they learned from using them.
  • Explain to students that they are going to show off some of the things they learned today.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (5 minutes)

  • Demonstrate to students how to create their clocks following the Make a Clock activity or using the Make a Clock worksheet. Be sure to explain how to place the numbers.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (15 minutes)

  • Have students make their clocks, lending assistance as required.
  • Tell the students this story about a group of children finding some money:
    Chris, Jan, and Tonia walk to school together every morning at 8:30. One day on the way to school they found 50 cents on the sidewalk. They took the money to the school's office and the principal said, “Thank you for thinking about the person who lost the money. I will put it in a safe place until the end of the day, and to see if we can find out whose money it is. If the owner does not claim the money by the end of the day, it will be yours.” At 12:00, the principal visited the classroom for 5 minutes to report to the children. Nobody at the school was in the office that morning to ask about money they lost. At 3:15, the principal called Chris, Jan, and Tonia to the office, gave them the 50 cents, and said, “No one has claimed the money so now you can have the 50 cents.”

Independent Working Time (20 minutes)

  • Ask your students how the 3 children can share the 50 cents. Allow children to ask questions for clarification, but each student must complete this problem individually.
  • Provide each group with coins as they work through the problem. Children will naturally look for a way to share the money evenly, but they may come up with some creative solutions for dealing with the leftover 2 cents.
  • Students will record their answers in their math journal.
  • Hand out On Time and give your students their handmade clocks. Have the students record the times as indicated in the problems.
  • Tell children that the story took place on a sunny autumn day. It was cold in the morning. At noon, it was much warmer. In the late afternoon, it was cooler, but not as cold as in the morning. Ask students to draw thermometers with possible temperatures for these times in the story.

Extend

Differentiation

  • Enrichment: Challenge students to calculate the total amount of time between finding the money and getting it back. Students could also be asked to draw scenes from the story, taking the temperature and time of day into account.
  • Support: Lend support to students unable to connect the hands using the brad winged fasteners. Read the story as a class and have students utilize manipulatives to understand what is being said.

Review

Assessment (10 minutes)

  • Note whether or not students are able to complete the following tasks:
  • Students solve the problem of how to create equivalent sets when dividing the 50 cents three ways.
  • Students are able to compare analog and digital clocks.
  • Students count coins accurately using the Coin Match worksheet.
  • Students record time on digital and analog clocks accurately using On Time.
  • Students determine whether temperature is rising or falling on a thermometer.
  • Students use appropriate measurement and comparative language.

Review and Closing (5 minutes)

  • Encourage the class to discuss their answers for all of today's problems, including how they split the 50 cents, how they converted written time to analog clocks, and how they measured the rising and falling of temperature.

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