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How to Develop a Behavior Plan (page 2)

How to Develop a Behavior Plan

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Updated on Oct 8, 2013

Plan Positive Interventions

Behavior plans require “interventions,” such as breaks during the day, a behavior tracking chart that gives him feedback on whether or not his behavior is appropriate, or a system for your child’s teacher to communicate his behavior to you so you can reward him at home. Whatever the interventions, encourage your child’s progress through positive reinforcement instead of threatening him with punishment.

Do Your Part

A behavior plan outlines the responsibilities of everyone involved, not just the student. Remember that you are part of a team, along with your child and his teacher, says George Giuliani, executive director of the National Association of Special Education Teachers.

Share Ideas

Once you’ve found a system that improves your child’s behavior at home, make sure you share that information with his teacher. If your child has consistent expectations at home and school, it becomes easier for your child to monitor his behavior in different settings, says Jannasch-Pennell.

Stick to the Plan

Once the plan is in place, give it at least four to six weeks to settle in. “These behaviors didn’t happen overnight,” says Giuliani, “and they won’t go away overnight.” Ultimately, however, you want to see your child’s behaviors change for the better. If they don’t, it’s okay to revisit and revise the plan.

Throughout the process, as you see how far your child has come, always celebrate the progress he has made. Dealing with behavior problems can seem overwhelming, but with a positive attitude and a thoughtful plan, you can help get your child on the path to success in and out of the classroom.

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