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Cyberbullying Statistics: What the Facts Mean for You (page 2)

Cyberbullying Statistics: What the Facts Mean for You

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Updated on Mar 9, 2012

If Your Child is the Bully

  • Move your computer to a central location. If your child's the perpetrator, it's a difficult position for you as a parent. You want to protect her but also make the bullying stop. One of the best ways to monitor your child or teen's behavior is to move her computer to a central, non-private location in your home so she doesn't have the luxury of using the computer without you peeking over her shoulder.
  • Sign up for accounts on the sites she frequents. Check out the sites your child visits and sign up for accounts yourself with or without her knowledge. Keep an eye on how she interacts with other users and talk to her if you notice unacceptable or threatening behavior.
  • Talk to your child about the consequences of her actions. She might not realize that being part of a flame war on a forum or making fun of a status on Facebook is hurtful and even punishable by law. If the bullying continues, consider it a sign that she's not mature enough to use the Internet responsibly, and take away her online priveledges.

Whether you're the parent of the bully or the bullied, it's in your power to stop the behavior and protect your child. By keeping tabs on your child's online behavior and the latest cyberbullying statistics, you'll know what's going on in the world of Facebook, MySpace and Twitter to react appropriately. Getting in tune with your teen's online habits now can save the hurt, shame, and punishment that stem from cyberbullying.

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