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Beyond the Lemonade Stand: 4 Great Summer Job Ideas for Teens (page 2)

Beyond the Lemonade Stand: 4 Great Summer Job Ideas for Teens

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Updated on May 27, 2014

Dog Walker

Does your child have a knack with animals? Dog walking costs next to nothing to start up and can be especially profitable in the summertime when pet owners may want to avoid the heat.

Teen To Do List: Advertise your services at a local animal shelter or pet store. The best times to walk are often in the early morning and at twilight, though you might want to propose a special “after hours” service for clients who work a little later. Spend some time getting to know each customer’s dog and make sure its leash is in good working order. Map out a safe route, keep extra water for the dogs on hand, and talk to pet owners about any dietary restrictions before offering treats to an animal.

Tips & Tricks: If you have a dog park nearby, you might consider offering a Saturday exercise session for clients with especially active dogs. Invest some of your earnings into rope pull toys and balls for your dogs so you’ve got something to set you apart from the competition.

Caution:  Remember leash laws and make sure you’ve got the essential tools to clean up after the pets you walk.

Landscape & Gardening Professional

If your child has a green thumb, landscaping could help line his pockets this summer.

Teen To Do List: Look around your neighborhood for untrimmed hedges, overgrown lawns and neglected summer gardens. What are your neighbors’ landscaping needs? Raid the garage for the necessary supplies—rakes, hoes, spades, hedge trimmers first, and then determine whether or not you want to throw in additional services (like weed or pest control) that might require some up-front capital and a trip to your local home improvement store. Charge either by the hour or by the service with an “a la carte” option for clients.

Tips & Tricks: Sweeten the deal by throwing in your services as a gardener. Do some research: a variety of vegetables are strong enough to withstand summer’s heat, and a small herb garden can thrive almost year-round in some climates with a little help. Most families are looking for ways to cut costs during the economic downturn, and offering to help them plan and start a small garden could save them an extra trip down the produce aisle—a factor that will make your services all the more attractive.

Caution: Prepare for working outdoors by using sunscreen and staying hydrated. Also, if you plan on using weed or pest control sprays, know the EPA regulations on their usage.

Preparation can make or break any small business enterprise. Bruch Hodgman, Deputy Director of Arizona’s Small Business Administration, says, “My advice to anyone thinking about starting a small business or even a lemonade stand: have a well prepared plan, make your idea match your resources, remember that 80% of all new businesses start without borrowing money . . . learn how to be an entrepreneur before you start.” With a little foresight and ingenuity, any teen can make summer earning fun.

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