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Back to School for the Child with Learning Disabilities (page 3)

Back to School for the Child with Learning Disabilities

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Updated on Jun 6, 2013

Take time to talk with your child.

“The weeks leading up to school is a great time to have conversations with your child about their strengths,” Meier says. Then you can move the conversation to the areas that are known to be difficult for your child. “How did we manage that last year? What did we do that really helped?” It’s important to frame the conversation in terms of solutions and strategies that seemed to work, Meier says.

Many kids with LD struggle at some point with low self-esteem. Meier suggests that the best antidote for those types of feelings is to alter the situation so the child can feel success. Through open dialogue you can help your child recognize his strengths and the ways in which he has been successful. A series of conversations before school begins can be particularly beneficial.

Help your child by helping yourself.

Perhaps most importantly, help yourself first. Put the oxygen mask on your face before your child’s. Become informed, connected, and empowered. Horowitz suggests you contact the local PTA and find out about the PTA group for children with LD. Or, look to the national associations for support. White suggests the LD Association and the International Dyslexia Association. Both of these associations’ Web sites have listings of state chapters and other state and national resources. White, who serves as project manager for LD.org, says their online Resource Locator will be up and running in early September. This particular resource can lead you to state departments of education, recreation programs for students with special needs, and many other types of programs and services (more than 2000 entries in all).

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