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What Makes a Good Special Ed Classroom? (page 2)

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Updated on Aug 27, 2010

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Resource or Pull-Out Classrooms: These classrooms, are ones in which students work in small groups on developing remedial skills, should be well-organized, with clear expectations, and should include many of the same features as an inclusion room, but on a smaller scale.

Self-Contained Classrooms: Self-contained classrooms, which have a special education teacher, but no general education teacher, are becoming increasingly rare. In the past 20 years, many schools have moved toward an inclusion model classroom because of concerns that kids with disabilities weren’t being exposed to the same kinds of learning opportunities as their non-disabled peers. At times, students may need a self-contained classroom, if their behavior is violent and puts other students at risk, or if they have a cognitive delay that is significant enough that they can’t benefit from the general education curriculum at all.

In the end, no matter what your child's classroom environment is, the most important take away is to make sure that your child with special needs is being provided with the support she needs and deserves in order to be successful in school.

Ellen Arnold, educational consultant, www.arncraft.com, 585-413-2426

Mary Z. McGrath, author, speaker, educator, former special ed teacher, “The Many Faces of Special Educators” 952-894-7707

Dr. George Giuliani, PhD, executive director National Association of Special Education Teachers, drgiuliani@aol.com, 631-427-6455 with Dr. Roger Pierangelo, executive director of NASET

 

 

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