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Toddler Reading: How to Raise a Bookworm (page 2)

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Updated on Feb 22, 2012

18 to 24 Months: Library Love

Once your toddler has hit the terrible two's, it's even more vital that you keep reading as a daily activity. If bedtime reading at home isn't enough to capture his attention, call up your local library—chances are they have a toddler or preschool story hour. Hearing another person read might be enough to get your child excited to go. Give him free range to pick out a few books from the shelves, so he doesn't get tired of the same old books at home—look specifically for characters that he knows and loves, like the Mo Willems "Pigeon" series or the "Llama, Llama" books by Anna Dewden. They follow the same characters so they seem familiar even though they're unfamiliar stories. Har agrees, pointing out that you shouldn't be afraid of rereading old favorites. "Reread preferred books as many times as possible," she suggests. "Children benefit from the repetition and feel a sense of accomplishment when they are able to predict and say aloud what is going to happen next in the story."

Reading shouldn't be all on your toddler's shoulders, either. Make sure that you always have a book, newspaper or other type of print media on-hand for yourself. Your little one is small, but he recognizes behavior patterns from his parents, so join a book club, read a series, whatever it takes to keep your nose in a book too!

As always, you can't force your child to love something. Even if you were a voracious reader as a child, your own flesh and blood might be more of an on-the-go type. If that's the case, books on tape or shorter magazine stories might capture his attention more. Just do what it takes to keep print media around your toddler and slowly but surely, you'll be raising a reader.

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