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Bronwynpta
Bronwynpta asks:
Q:

My 8 year old daughter gets confused between the letters b and d how can i help her?

In Topics: Helping my child with writing
> 60 days ago

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Expert

BarbK
Feb 15, 2010
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What the Expert Says:

Here are two tricks you can try.  One is to write the word "bed" on a piece of paper and then draw a bed around the word.  Point out the bed begins with /b/ sound and ends with a /d/ sound.  If she knows how to spell bed, she should be set.

Another visual you can use is to form a capital B and point out that the lower case b can be found in the capital letter (the lower part of the capital).

If you are still noticing reversals, bring it to your daughter's teachers.  There may be a learning problem that can be nipped in the bud at an early age.  Believe, I know from first hand experience.

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Additional Answers (5)

Bronwynpta
Bronwynpta writes:
Thanks BarbK for your advice i will try it. How did you know your child had a learning problem ? .My daughter did below average in Grade 1 so I keep her a year back. She has done grade 1 twice. She has moved on to grade 2, but i am still concerned.
Regards Bronwyn
> 60 days ago

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Icymint
Icymint writes:
Make your right hand and your left hand into a fist.  Say to the child "A" then use your left hand to make B.  Now say "C" and use your right hand to make D.  If you put both hands together with the letters formed, they make really cool glasses over your eyes and your child will think it's cool.  I wish I could model it.
> 60 days ago

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gforcex5
gforcex5 writes:
I teach 1st grade and encounter this problem daily.  I have found that when we read we read from left to right.  When we write the same principle should apply.  a b should be made with the line first then come up and around to make the circle on the bottom.  The d is made with a circle first and then a line. if they are made different they will be recognized as different letters.  I hope that his helps.
> 60 days ago

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justice65
justice65 , Caregiver, Parent writes:
You might want to have her see an eye doctor that can detect any eye condition that your child might have .Dyslexia is an impairment in your brain's ability to translate written images received from your eyes into meaningful language. Also called specific reading disability, dyslexia is the most common learning disability in children.


Your doctor may also suggest that your child undergo:

Vision, hearing and neurological evaluations.

These evaluations can help determine whether another disorder may be causing or contributing to your child's poor reading ability.

A psychological assessment. This can help determine whether social problems, anxiety or depression may be limiting your child's abilities.

An evaluation of educational skills. Your child may take a set of educational tests and have the process and quality of his or her reading skills analyzed by an expert.

There's no known way to correct the underlying brain malfunction that causes dyslexia. Dyslexia treatment is through remedial education, and the sooner intervention begins, the better it generally is for your child. Psychological testing will help your child's teachers develop a suitable remedial teaching program.

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Mirandouli
Mirandouli writes:
I teach Nursery to Primary 6 children.  "b and d" confusion is VERY common in the early years and I don't believe this alone constitutes or is necessarily an indicator of any serious learning problem. Most of my students went through it for some period of time - (short and long). All of them have been able to understand the different letter constructs eventually.

I have made up some pictures of beds and we read  "b…. e….  d"  with the "b at the beginning" and "d at the end".

We also do the clench fists and thumbs pointing up, to reinforce the visual representations that our fists make (but be careful that they look at their palms - not the back of their hands.

Try learning skills, listening, touching, seeing, cutting out the shapes, drawing in sand, drawing in the air, punching the air with the clenched "b" or "d" fist.  Mummy's name starts with the sound "b". Daddy has 3 "d"s in it.

Once having laid out something that she can concretely remember then I would concentrate on one letter at a time. Not always comparing "b" and "d".  If she has either in her name, concentrate on that one first.

Even as an adult, when I am writing really quickly I often flip my letters the other way "b" becomes "p" and "d" become "q".

Hope that helps.
> 60 days ago

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