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shirley010203
shirley010203 asks:
Q:

Do you have any advice about intestinal malrotation?  My preemie baby, who suffered from IUGR was just diagnosed with it.

My preemie baby, who suffered from IUGR, and has eating difficulties, was just diagnosed with intestinal malrotation.  I'd like to know if there's anyone out there who can share more information with me.  For example, if I should consider surgery now or wait for an emergency.  The malrotion is at the upper left quadrant starting at the duodenum, missing the pitch, and the appendix is "floating" somewhere in the upper right quadrant.  If you have any advice or information, please contact me.  Thank you, Shirley S.
In Topics: Medical problems
> 60 days ago

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Developmentalist
Development... writes:
Shirley - One of our partners has a very good article on this subject.  You can copy and paste this  URL into your browser:

http://www.kidshealth.org/parent/medical/digestive/malrotation.html

Our partner is called Kids Health and you can also contact them directly by going to:

www.kidshealth.org
> 60 days ago

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pandacsek
pandacsek writes:
The only advice I can give you is get it done right away! You don't want to wait until your baby turns blue in your arms and you have to call 911 and the ambulance might come too late to save your lo! This condition is not a joke at all, can turn really bad really fast. I just had my baby have the same surgery 4 days ago, we are still in the hospital recovering. He is almost 6 month old and he was having stomach cramps and the doctors thought it is just a simple reflux. I kept taking him back to the doctor until she finally sent him to an upper GI where it turned out that beside the reflux he has malrotation. The surgery is quick, the recovery not that fast but bottom line: you are saving your baby's life! You have to get it done!
> 60 days ago

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mheyman
mheyman writes:
The answers provided are absolutely correct.  While most babies who are spitting have 'simple' gastroesophageal reflux (GER), occasionally babies have persistent spitting beyond the usual (either lasting beyond infancy or getting progressively worse rather than improving as your baby gets older, bigger and more mature) -- in these circumstances, further evaluation including an upper GI xray that especially focuses on the intestinal anatomy is important to make sure there is not a malrotation leading to the symptoms.  Once diagnosed, it should be repaired.  A malrotated intestine is not fixed inside the abdomen (the belly) and can easily twist on itself (causing a volvulus; see link below).  Once the bowel twists, the blood supply caught within the twist is cut off, so the intestine will become 'necrotic' -- it will not get any oxygen, turns blue, and dies.  

So no reason to wait to fix it, since in the rare situation where the bowel twists, dire consequences including loss of intestine from lack of blood supply and even death of the child can result.

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TwistedFate
TwistedFate writes:
Surgery!  Find the best pediatric surgeon immediately and save your child from a life of pain & trauma.  I lived 56 years of intestinal malrotation hell, it caused a miscarriage of one of our children due to daily twisting off of hydration and blood supply, our third child almost died in-utero and I had 35 unnecessary surgeries in 9.5 years.  Your child is lucky to be diagnosed so young and get the help now.  Without surgery you are playing Russian Roulette with your child's life.  Go to:  http://www.chop.edu/healthinfo/intestinal-malrotation-and-volvulus.html
Pick up the phone now Shirley!

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