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Anonymous
Anonymous asks:
Q:

Does anyone have advice about kindergarten early entrance exams?

In Topics: Kindergarten readiness, Tests (preparing, taking, anxiety!), State education standards
> 60 days ago

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Seattleite4
Seattleite4 writes:
I would ask you to think really hard about what advantages your child will have by sending them to kindergarten early? Is there any benefit? In almost every case, you are putting your child at a developmental  disadvantage for their entire school life. Right now they are 4. Think about when your child is 12 with all the kids around them a year or a full year and a half older due to the trend of holding out summer birthdays. Think about when all their school mates are getting licenses, when they are able to get jobs and work after school. Think about the physical disadvantages of being a year to a year and a half younger in P.E. or the locker room. Think about your child packing up the car and driving off to college at 17 years old rather than 18. If your feel your child is advanced at 4 it does not mean you feel your child is advanced at 7 or 8. Some development can be lead. Some development only occurs through maturation. Your child will be at a developmental disadvantage. I just don't understand why a parent would want to do that. Please think. It is a decision that lasts until your child is 17 or 18. Perhaps forever if your notices that everyone is quicker, faster and stronger.
> 60 days ago

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Laker
Laker writes:
As a teacher with 25 years of kindergarten classroom experience I know of which I speak.
The best way to tell if a child is ready for formal learning in a kindergarten classroom is to observe his/her vocabulary and social skills. Ask yourself as parent these questions:  Can my child make his or her needs known with his verbal skills? Can he ask and answer simple questions?
Is he or she able to sit and listen to a story for 10 minutes without interrupting (too much)? Can he or she follow a two step direction independently? (e.g. "Please hang up your coat and wash your hands." ) Can he/she do self help tasks independently (wash hands, put on coat etc.) Have you read to your child consistently and sung songs with him/her?
Children entering kindergarten should have some prior knowledge of letters and sounds and be able to identify some numbers. This is taught in kindergarten but a child's immediate success comes along faster if he/she has been exposed to these areas. Holding a pencil or crayon properly and having had practice drawing and writing will also give your child a leg up as well.  Parent should know that public kindergarten is different from when they went to school. The time allotted to play experiences has been eaten away by curriculum shove-down from Grade One and a lot more is expected.  One huge factor you should consider is age. There is a lot, and I do mean a lot, of information in books and on the internet about when you should send a child to school. Full day or half day?  In my opinion, it all depends on your child's physical stamina and the program. If your school district offers a full day K program, he or she will need a lot of stamina. If your 5 year old child is a "nap in the afternoon" kid. Wait a year before enrolling him or her. Cranky kids can learn and have behaviour problems. With boys in this situration, find a good pre-school and wait a year. Boys mature slower than their female counterparts of the same age.
As for your original question, readiness tests will tell only part of the answer. Have an early childhood professional that works in the school observe your child at play or pre-school. Discuss the above ideas and then decide. Remember, your child's school career should begin when he/she is ready and not when it's convienent for your work schedule or when the neighbors kids are going. Children develop at different rates and need different things in order to be successful. Wise parents whotake all these factors into consideration will launch a ready child.
> 60 days ago

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lotus1
lotus1 writes:
Just make a child to recognise colours speak his name and his parents too...recognising common animals and fruits (Five)...you can buy charts.its enough for the child...dont put pressure on the child..
> 60 days ago

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CBrimmer
CBrimmer writes:
The main thing is to work with your child daily, whether while walking outside (look a BLUE bird, GREEN leaves!) or eating dinner (carrots yum! carrots are vegetables, chicken yay! chicken is meat) also counting steps helps (ten steps from the tree to the swing set now lets count by twos!) Your child will learn it very quickly, just make the learning part of your normal day. I do not believe that early entrance makes a difference socially, I was a four year starter and skipped two grades, so everyone was at least a year or in one case two and a half years older, and by the time I got into high school, everyone respected that for my intelligence, and yes I went to public schools all the way!
> 60 days ago

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micki78
micki78 writes:
I can't find anything about what is required for kindergarten?
> 60 days ago

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hannahjo
hannahjo writes:
Story telling, maths tasks and a running record tests will be carried out to check the aptitude of the child. The maturity level and social development and interaction skills will also be taken into account, to allow him an entry into the kindergarten

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