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kryscott99
kryscott99 asks:
Q:

Behavior issues in Kindergarten

My daughter turned 6 this week and is in Kindergarten. She recently, in the last month, started acting out in class. She went from being one of the best behaved students in class to one of the worst. The Teacher is calling me DAILY to come pick her up from school, but only because this behavior is "immature" and "out of character" for my child not because she is really "bad." I asked the teacher why she doesn't just send her to the principal for all this bad behavior and she said, "it doesn't warrant a trip to the principal and it is just bizarre behavior."  My child is very bright and is on a 2nd grade reading level already so I know the work being too difficult is not an issue at this point. She has always hated large groups and that is where all this behavior started...during large groups. Could this be an anxiety issue at this young of an age?  I am also wondering if the teacher is just tired of dealing with the bizarre behavior or if it is time to seek counseling for my child? Today the teacher said my child was pretending to eat paper and making babbling noises instead of talking and refused to make eye contact.  I tried extra rewards at home and that seemed to make things worse because she said I made it too hard to be good at school---I set the bar too high---even when I lowered the bar it didn't help. I tried taking away her birthday presents this week and that didn't help. We tried time outs and spankings and that didn't work either.  Any other suggestions??
In Topics: Discipline and behavior challenges
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Boys Town National Hotline
Feb 28, 2014
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What the Expert Says:

Parenting can be very difficult and frustrating at times, to say the least.  As parents we want our children to succeed and when we see them struggle it can be very difficult to know how to best help them.

If you have not already, you may want to consider setting up a meeting to speak with the Principal, School Psychologist and/or Counselor and your daughter’s teacher.   Talk with them about your concerns and see if they can help develop a plan that will aid in dealing with your daughter's behavioral issues so she can get the help she needs to be successful in the classroom.  This may mean seeing if the School Psychologist can observe and evaluate her in the classroom.  The School Psychologist’s assessment can then provide you with some clear recommendations on how to best help her.

You may also want to contact your daughter’s Pediatrician, who can be an invaluable resource for getting your daughter the assistance she needs.  If you have not already you may want to have your daughter seen by the Pediatrician for a wellness check to rule out any underlying medical issues.  The Doctor can also make sure she is meeting all the developmental milestones for her age.  If you find that she is not where she needs to be developmentally, then consider talking with the Doctor about having some Cognitive Testing done.  You will also want to speak with the Doctor, at that time, about the issue your daughter has with large groups and anxiety.  

Boys Town National Hotline
1-800-448-3000

    
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Additional Answers (6)

Cynthia_R1029
Cynthia_R1029 writes:
She might be bored and to smart have her tested for gifted
> 60 days ago

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concernedmoma
concernedmoma writes:
I am dealing with the exact same situation only I have a son who is about to turn 6. His teacher says he pretends to yawn during reading group and lays on the other kids. She says she thinks he is eating paper and crayons but has not seen him do it. He has a fine sensory delay which causes him to have anxiety especially in large groups.  His Occupational Therapist gave me a list of things to give to his teacher to do when he starts acting out like haveing him do wall push ups then come rejoin the group or crab walk from center to center to avoid the actinng out in the first place.  However his school is either unwilling to implement these helpful activities or they can't because of class size so I'm at a loss on how to help him if they won't cooperate. Punishing the child hours after an incident is unfair because they need discipline immediately after the action. If the school is already takeing something away like recess then you would be double punishing the child giving the child a consequence at home too. Rewarding when they do good works best for my son but when they are having a hard time what do you do?
> 60 days ago

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TeacherandParent
TeacherandP... writes:
The phrase bizarre behavior is concerning. Talk to your family doctor about this and/or request that the school psychologist observe your daughter and evaluate her.

For a child to grow restless and occasionally misbehave in school is one thing - for a child to be eating paper and babbling is another thing altogether. This could be related to extreme anxiety but if your daughter is very anxious she will not be made less anxious by being sent to the Principal.
> 60 days ago

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devbens
devbens writes:
Also having the same issue.  My son is just 5 and started Kindergarten in August.  By week three he had been called out daily for disruptive behavior and was sent to the principal's office for a more strict time-out.

He was in a very structured Pre-K program for 18 months and per his teachers, was a very well-behaved, bright student, and maturity-wise, ready for Kindergarten.  Some of the current disruptive behavior is very out of character - deliberately not following directions, lying on the carpet rather than sitting, talking without raising hands, greeting his new friends with very physical hugging.  Could this just be a transitional issue?  New school, no friends from Pre-K came over with him.

My bigger concern - and I don't know if I SHOULD be concerned - is that the teacher is already giving indications that my son may not be 'ready for Kindergarten'.  We feel this is a little premature.

Anyone have similar experiences?  Is this assessment too premature?  We are monitoring it at home and talking to his teachers regularly.
4 days ago

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zieshashey
zieshashey writes:
she needs to be dealt with more love and care
22 hours ago

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kryscott99
kryscott99 writes:
Update to my question from last year. After continuing to fight with the teacher we met numerous times with the Principal & Assistant Principal. They suggested changing teachers. I was against it at first, but finally I caved after the teacher called my child a demon & bold faced lied to me. I went as far as tape recording conversations with her to catch her lying! It got bad. Needless to say the DAY we switched classes I had my old baby back. It wasn't about not enough love at home, trust me she had plenty thank you, it wasn't about her being "demonic" as the previous teacher suggested. It was the teacher had NO classroom managment skills whatsoever. The new teacher had complete control over her class & my child never once had another complaint. She was #1 reader in all of Kindergarten 2nd semester and did NOT come home with one bad mark in her folder the entire rest of the year. Sometimes students & teachers just don't fit together. I do not believe you should always be able to choose who your boss is or who your teacher is, but in this case it was detremential to my child's learning environment. I did what was best for my child. I had tried everything else 1st....physicologist, pedetricians, meetings with teachers & principal, etc.
8 hours ago

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