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angelawcarter
angelawcarter asks:
Q:

Do children with Asperger Syndrome grow out of it?

Do children with Asperger Syndrome grow out of it? Should a parent seek outside help besides the school system that their child attends?
In Topics: Autism & Aspergers Syndrome
> 60 days ago

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Expert

lkauffman
Jan 3, 2008
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What the Expert Says:

Hi Angela,

What an excellent question. As you may know Asperger's Disorder is a syndrome in which an individual experiences difficulties in social communication, motor skills, and limited interests or preoccupations. Interestingly, the unique constellation of symptoms can look a little different in each individual. Most experts believe that these symptoms evolve over the years, some becoming more pronounced, others receding. However, the foundation or core symptoms remain.

Depending upon the unique needs of a child, many parents do seek outside support outside of the school system. Indeed, many parents find that they prefer the variety and intensity of services available with community occupational therapists, psychologists, educational therapists, etc. Of course, it really depends upon whether the child is succeeding academically, socially, etc. Some children simply need more support than others.

The below article provides a nice summary of Asperger's across the lifepan:
http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Asperger_Long/

Hope this helps. Do others have additional input?

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Additional Answers (3)

MillieIan2004
MillieIan2004 writes:
I have the same question: Do Children with Asperger Syndrome grow out of it? do a parent need to seek outside help?
> 60 days ago

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TimeTorn
TimeTorn writes:
I was diagnosed with Aspergers as a child. I'm 26 now.

I can tell you first hand that this is NOT something that can be "outgrown".

It's not all bad news though. As you may already know, Aspergers comes with many positive aspects. Asperger children tend to do exceedingly well in subjects they are interested in. For me, this enabled me to read at the same level as a 5th year college graduate. I also do quite well in science, computers, and mechanics.

Each person will have different symptoms, so there's no way to be sure how your child will turn out.

There's hope for Asperger children to grow up to live normal happy lives. Since Aspergers is essentially caused by a PHYSICAL deformity in the brain, and this physical deformity won't likely ever change, you cannot expect an Asphergers child to ever be "normal".

We are great at coping with our flaws though. Since the Asperger brain is a logical brain, and not natively a social brain, we eventually learn to apply logic and reasoning to cope with our social ineptitude. Outwardly, we may appear to be functioning normally, but we are always struggling in order to achieve this normal outwardly appearance. We must learn to recognize facial expressions, sarcasm, etc, and then we must remember to react appropriately.

If you've ever twisted your ankle and had to use a crutch to get around, you'll know that a crutch isn't as good as a functional leg. It takes a lot more effort, and you can't exactly run a marathon with a crutch. That's basically what Asperger adults deal with on a daily basis.

Here is some advise I would have given my own parents if I could go back in time.

Don't make a big deal out of it. If you constantly baby your Asperger child, and remind them on a daily basis that they are not normal, and if you tell them they have a mental disorder, they will use it as an excuse.

Hope for the best, expect the worst. There will be tough times. Don't freak out and be overly upset with your child.

Keep calm, please. If you find yourself at your wits end, take a moment to breathe and calm yourself. You cannot expect your child to behave calmly if you can't do the same. This is especially true if your child shows signs of bipolarism.

Avoid over medicating. Asperger brains are different, and they will react adversely to all sorts of medications. Even some over the counter allergy medicines could leave your child in a total brain fog, or even send them into a manic rage. Prescription medications can even cause hallucinations, PERMANENT MEMORY PROBLEMS (Depecote), hyperactivity, severe mood swings, etc. If you make the decision to medicate, DO YOUR RESEARCH! talk to your doctor about potential health risks and side effects. Search online for info about the use of any medication in Autistic children. Start with a dosage that is 2/3 or less than the minimum effective dosage. I was prescribed lithium at one point in my life. It was supposed to take WEEKS before any effects would be noticeable. I took HALF of the minimum effective dosage, and within hours of taking the first dose, I was absolutely out of it. I could barely form a sentence in my head, let alone speak coherently. It was very unpleasant, especially since I was living alone at the time. So BE VERY CAREFUL with any medications.

Your child has a gift. You will see them excel beyond what any normal child is capable of, in certain areas. When you find your child's gift, nurture it. Do everything in your power to ensure your child receives the best education possible to nurture that gift. It's bad enough he/she will have to deal with all of the negative aspects of Aspergers. Give them their one advantage, and make sure they will be able to utilize it to it's maximum potential, because they will definitely need it later on in life.

Follow this advise and I'm sure your child will grow up one day to be an AMAZING adult.
10 days ago

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nagasahithya
nagasahithya writes:
Asperger's syndrome or Asperger disorder is a type of pervasive developmental disorder. PDDs are a group of conditions that involve delays in the development of many basic skills, most notably the ability to socialize with others, to communicate, and to use imagination.

Children who have been diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome will have problem with social life. At the same time, they might have highly developed language skills and can often communicate at great length on their favourite topics.

Children with Asperger's syndrome may be more vulnerable to being bullied or socially isolated and specific management plan addressing these important issues can therefore be essential.

An intervention that helps one child may not be suitable for another, so parents should always seek professional guidance.
10 days ago

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