Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus
amcclain
amcclain asks:
Q:

my childs teacher has never taught anything but preschool now shes teaching kidnergarten for the first time and i'm concerned should I be?

In Topics: School and Academics
> 60 days ago

|
mahogony
mahogony writes:
I don't feel that you should be worried because most preschoolers are learning the same things that the Kindergarten children for example how to recognize their ABC's, colors and shapes.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
doreenkaiser
doreenkaiser writes:
Although you may consider preschool non-academic, preschoolers are expected to learn many of the life-long skills that will enable them to be readers and learners.  Children who attend preschool have a reading edge over their non-preschool peers.  Emergent readers and readers, yes readers, get their start in preschool.  Not only do preschoolers beging the reading journey earlier, preschoolers learn how to behave as learners.  They learn cooperation, critical thinking, and problem solving.  An adept preschool teacher prepares a child for kindergarten and beyond.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
EdEd
EdEd writes:
Possibly. Very rarely in education does a previous position or level of training indicate how good or prepared a teacher will be. For example, you could have a teacher that has taught K for 20 years, but be worse than a brand new teacher, because the brand new teacher may bring things the veteran doesn't.

All things being equal, it's better to have someone with experience, of course. So, you may be concerned about the teacher simply because of lack of experience, but it doesn't mean she'll be a bad teacher - may just need to get the hang of things.

To respond to some of the other comments about preschool vs. K, there are increasing differences between these two grades. 15 years ago, it was probably more similar, but there has been a recent push to do a lot more structured and evidence-based academic instruction in K, whereas many preschools are still primarily play-based and/or exploratory learning-based. In other words, a good K teacher will have certain academic instruction/intervention skills that a preschool teacher would probably not have learned in college or in in-service trainings at their school. To the degree that the teacher is smart, has gotten appropriate training in K instruction, and is otherwise a skilled teacher, I think you'll be fine. However, if your child is a child that needs a lot of support to be successful, you may want to pay a bit more attention to the specific things going on in the classroom.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
Answer this question