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Daisy Flower
Daisy Flower asks:
Q:

What is a parent to do about PG movies being played in school?

The teacher has played "The Cat in the Hat" rated PG starring Mike Myers to the kindergarten class with out consent from parents or Principal.  She has played other PG movies in the past also with out consent.  The school has a no movie policy for the Elemetary school.  There have been meetings to resolve this and there conclusion is she agreed not to play anymore movie's.  The problem here is she feels she has done no wrong.  How can she be trusted?  The decision doesn't feel right to me.  She was caught this time because there was a voleenter in the room at the time.  I think a camera placed in the room would be the solution.  She is an elderly teacher and is head of the teachers Union.  Am I going overboard?
In Topics: My Relationship with my child's school
> 60 days ago

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Redwood_City_Mom
Redwood_Cit... writes:
Hi Daisy Flower,

As a mom, I know how scary it is to put your child in someone else's hands for six hours a day. If you can't get to a place where you trust your child's teacher and the school you'll be a basket case every morning when you send your child off to school every day!

That said, I don't think I agree with the idea of monitoring the teacher with a camera all day. If there are concerns about the safety of the kids while they're in her care, then she she shouldn't be in the classroom. But being a teacher is a REALLY hard job, and it would be impossible to make all 20+ sets of parents completely happy all day. Opening herself up to minute by minute scrutiny would be incredibly hard and distracting and would keep her from ever being a great teacher.

It sounds like the school and teacher were responsive to parents' concerns about the movie situation and that PG movies won't be shown any longer. That's actually a great sign - it doesn't always go that way!

Are there other things you're worried about besides the movies? Is she otherwise doing the kinds of things you think are appropriate for your kindergartner? If you have other specific concerns, I'd ask to have a meeting with the teacher and the principal to share them. Maybe you could request that she communicate more with parents about what's going on in the classroom by posting her lesson plans or sending home a weekly note.

If you really can't get comfortable with the idea of your child being in the teacher's class, you may need to think about changing classes or schools. But remember that NO teacher or school is perfect. And no one will ever have exactly the same ideas as you about what's right for your child. So if the teacher is mostly doing the best thing for your child, and if the school is responsive when she doesn't, I'd try to make that situation work before you put yourself and your child through the stress of making a big change.

Good luck!
> 60 days ago

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ilovechefwilliam
ilovechefwi... , Teacher, Caregiver writes:
Dear Daisy Flower,
As a teacher myself I pay close attention to what I show in the classroom.  There are many copyright laws that prevent movies just being shown.  If the teacher does want to show a movie, there has to be documentation showing how it is going to be incorporated into the lesson plans.  Was she planning to compare and contrast the movie with the book?  Was there a reason that she chose the real movie?  I think that it is good that the school is trying to be proactive.  No matter what kind of things school does, there are always going to be the teachers that don't realize errors in their teaching.  As a parent if this situation came up again, I would ask to see lesson plans?  Most schools require teachers to submit lesson plans before.  Good Luck!
> 60 days ago

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TeachKids4Tomorrow
TeachKids4T... writes:
Hi Daisy. I'm an elementary teacher and for decades I've seen this type of behavior happen from my peers. I myself, when I first started, did the same thing when I finished a lesson very early and it was the end of the day with 20 minutes left to go. I also would show Disney movies in parts because I thought the students would enjoy them and, all Disney movies are safe right? Wrong. I learned as I became more experienced and actually moved around to a different district, (due to my husband being promoted to a new town), that I was incorrect in showing any type of movie to students, with, or especially without their permission. The person who initially replied to you and stated that the teacher was not in the wrong and has too many other things going on with 20+ students in the class so that she's never going to please all parents, is wrong for saying that. I had 32 students ever since I started, primary and upper grade. I learned that there are general rules to follow regarding all students with number one being to focus on "teaching first". Showing movies at all during class for inclement weather (#1 excuse to do it), holidays, or just because, is wrong. There are educational and fun activities to do with students that they will love and will keep their brains growing. You are just in your feelings about this teacher not being responsible enough to do her job and work to find alternative ways to entertain while educating. I learned that films that relate to actual curriculum are not "movies". They're documentaries that are no more than 25 minutes long and very specifically outline the specific standards on a particular subject that we have just wrapped up. That doesn't even happen that often since I noticed that students quickly get bored with "watching". They love engaging and active learning. I work hard to the bone to make sure I don't get lazy and look for the easy way out because I'm ready to sail away to an island and kick back on a beach. Until that time comes I need to think about the students placed in my care and the trust that parents are giving to schools that we are giving 100% in allowing students to engage in their own way of learning. Not forcing students and parents to fit our standards because we feel we work too hard. I apologize that you were told a teacher deserves a break during her work hours and should be given some slack for failing to do her job. She should apologize to the parents and the students. Then she needs to immediately retire.
> 60 days ago

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