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Cupie Doll
Cupie Doll asks:
Q:

What should a parent do if her teen is getting taunted/bullied and she has no friends?

In Topics: Bullying and teasing, Friendships and peer relationships
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Boys Town National Hotline
May 5, 2009
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What the Expert Says:

It's heartbreaking for a parent to see their child being bullied and ultimately emotionally hurt. It's a good bet that your teens self esteem has been hurt by the taunting they have experienced. Have you sat down and talked to your teen about how she's feeling? Continue to give her praise and encouragement while she is going through this time. She needs to know that she is still very loved and cared for even if other people aren't making her feel that way.

If the bullying is occurring at school encourage your teen to get involved in outside activities such as music lessons, art classes, or sports teams that aren't affiliated with the school such as an inter-mural team. It's important for teens to receive recognition and acceptance from their peers, so if she's not getting it at school, she needs to look elsewhere for it. Another positive alternative to the activities above is joining a faith based youth group. Teens often find healing and comfort in a spiritual setting. They may also find that they are not the only one feeling alone and lonely.

If you feel like your teen is experiencing depression due to the way she's being treated, you may want to take the next step which is taking her to talk to a community counselor so she can discuss new ways of coping with how she's feeling.

If you need referrals for counselors in your area or you or your daughter want to talk to someone about this situation please know that our crisis line is available for you to call 24/7. We can be reached by calling 1-800-448-3000. We're here to help!

Boys Town National Hotline
1-800-448-3000

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Additional Answers (7)

rocker chick
rocker chick writes:
she should relize that maybe she should pretend that those things don't bother her. i know its hard to do that but it really works
> 60 days ago

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abauti26
abauti26 writes:
First, keep communicating w/ your teen about their feelings and what he/she is going through. Teens often live secret lives outside from home because of rejection or ridiculing from peers. As for having friends, I would suggest that they participate in a school organization or sport. School organizations is one way for your teen to meet other students, become active, and help break that barrier.
> 60 days ago

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Dr. Hillary
Dr. Hillary writes:
Friendships are extremely important for people of all ages, and they play different roles throughout lifespan.  All adolescents want to belong, and not having friends at this time of development would raise a red flag to me.  What is your teen's emotional health?  Is she happy?  Sad?  Does she sleep more than normal?  Is she extremely moody?  Could she be depressed?  On the other hand, what makes her such an easy target of bullying?  Low self-esteem?  To help your daughter, your first step should be an evaluation by a health care provider.

Dr. Hillary
> 60 days ago

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7 In Heaven
7 In Heaven , Student, Child Professional, Teacher, Caregiver, Parent writes:
First you have to be open and honest with her and yourself about what is happening in her life.  Ask why doesn't she have any friends?  Why is she being bullied?  What is she doing that may be the cause of her discomfort not someone else?  She has to keep a positive energy within herself and be happy no matter who talks to her, plays with her, sits next to her, or any other interaction she has with others.  Also if you are happy as a person first and then as a parent (male or female) she will see the joy and positive energy coming from you then she will be happy because you are and may not have any of those issues with others.  Check out how to raise your vibration.  This link is for a motivational speaker who shares ways to raise your vibration.  It really works and this is not only for adults!  When you change your perception of yourself others will notice and things will change for the better for you.  I hope this little tidbit helps.  I'm not 7 In Heaven for nothing. (7 children)
> 60 days ago

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rorr&j
rorr&j writes:
I am actually having somewhat of a similar problem but my son who is 11 thinks noone likes him and his friends are starting to be mean to him and I blame myself because I have been through alot of turmoil in the last couple of years, and my son has in turn been through it also, if you are going through things and are depressed your children may become depressed or have very low self esteem. My son plays sports and is still going through this. I feel maybe family counseling would be a good start, together and independantly.
> 60 days ago

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LissaR227
LissaR227 writes:
The best thing for you child is to builded self esteem! Look for outside activities to boost her/his self esteem.
If you have talked to the teachers, guidance counselors and administration I would write a formal complaint. See were that takes you.
> 60 days ago

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native4christ
native4christ writes:
The worst thing to do is sit by and continue to let it happen.

As your child's parent, it is your obligation and responsibility to contact the school and get to the bottom of it.

If the school system can't assist with resolving the issues, I would be pulling my child out of the public school system and Homeschool.

I must admit that I am definitely bias here, as I am a Homeschooling Mom and have very little tolerance for public school issues. Although I do have a stepson in public school, per his dads choice.

So be your child's Advocate!!!

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