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sharon28753
sharon28753 asks:
Q:

this is not a question but a statement.

This is not a question but a statement. I'm a 60 year old female that I have to admit I cannot do simple two digit math or spelling or whatever. I'm ashamed of it.
Many reason..stroke 3 years ago and fibromyalgia fog. I found out just how bad I am when i was playing a game of brain buddy's.
It absolutely beat my but.
so here's what i am going to do. i am going to make a very concern work on the worksheets every evening for at least and hour. Hope you'll help to cheer me. wonder how many other people are in the same situation.
In Topics: Helping my child with school work and home work, Learning disabilities
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Louiseasl
Jun 29, 2011
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What the Expert Says:

Thank you Sharon for sharing your difficulties with us here on Education.com.  I applaud your attitude and desire to continue learning.

Consider working with manipulatives, such as dice, when learning math skills.  Also, fun games that are in the kids toy aisles which use basic math skills also can be a fun way to learn math (such as Yahtzee).

Good luck and keep in touch!

Regards,

Louise Sattler
Nationally Certified School Psychologist
Owner of SIGNING FAMILIES
http://www.SigningFamilies.com

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Additional Answers (3)

kat_eden
kat_eden , Parent writes:
Wow Sharon.  Thanks for sharing your story.  You're an inspiration and I wish you all the best in your journey.  You can do it!

Kat
> 60 days ago

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Karenmom
Karenmom writes:
Hi Sharon28753,

This is a great idea and I think you will have fun with the worksheets and activities here at education.com.  

It's a great idea for everyone to get "brain exercise" and I look forward to hearing more from you and how you are doing!

You have all of our support!!!

Best Wishes & Have Fun!!

Karen
> 60 days ago

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Tchrgrl
Tchrgrl writes:
The way students learn math is a 3 step process.  First, they learn through concrete examples such as manipulatives (things you touch and move).  I use cubes, pennies, anything.  I good game for this is how many are missing, in which you know the total, hide some of them, count the number that are left, and then figure out how many are missing.  Any games where you touch things are good.

The next step is pictures.  Pictures are abstract for young students, but close to concrete.  You may want to find worksheets with lots of pictures on them.

The final step is numbers, which are highly abstract because they represent the number and students cannot visualize how many the number represents or tell by looking at the number.  

Maybe your number sense was effected when you had your medical issues.  I think by determining where you are in this process, you can rebuild some of the connections you may have lost.  Good luck.
> 60 days ago

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