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ktwillson
ktwillson asks:
Q:

Can you recommend the best homeschooling curriculums for dyslexic children?

I have an 8 year old son that was privately diagnosed, the school still won't acknowledge his challenges or his dyslexia even though it is written in a report from a well known psychologist.  I am moving next year and have decided that I will homeschool my children.  I have a reading program already for my son from Horizons but wondering what Curriculum would be best for him as he really won't be able to read anything, do I need to read all his work to him or is there something that would work better.  I love Sonlight Curriculum so would be interested if anybody has used this and how they have adapted it.  Please help as I don't want to do him an injustice by Homeschooling.
In Topics: Homeschooling, Dyslexia
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Wayne Yankus
Jan 2, 2009
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What the Expert Says:

Try the Orton-Gillingham method, and look up books by Caroline Janover.

Wayne Yankus, MD, FAAP
expert panelist: pediatrics.

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Additional Answers (21)

sgtswife03
sgtswife03 writes:
I don't have an answer for you, but I am going through the same thing, but homeschooling has done wonders for my child since I pulled her out of public school.  I just diagnosed her.  Anyway, I hope you find the best curriculum for it, and I hope the same for myself as I search for the best for my daughter.  I heard great things about sonlight. :)
> 60 days ago

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LDSolutions
LDSolutions , Child Professional writes:
From my own experience, there isn't just one program that works.  You will need to do a combination of a few different programs.  In language arts I highly recommend using an Orton-Gillingham based program.  There are lots on the market now.  Susan Barton has a homeschooling program, there is S.P.I.R.E., Recipe for Reading are a good start in your research.  You will need to do Orton-Gillingham lessons at least one hour every day.  Then for math, I really like Saxon Math.  They have a great homeschooling program.  It is very systematic, cumulative and structured.  They also have an on-line test you can take to place your child in the correct level.  Those are your two most important subjects right now.  The science and social studies can be extremely hands-on by going to the beach, aquariums, museums, nature hikes and centers, missions, etc.  
Good luck to you and have fun.  For more information regarding Orton-Gillingham, click on the link below:

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nbfan
nbfan writes:
Well, I am now in a similar boat with you since my son's private school closed and am looking for curriculum for my son.  I used to use Calvert School Curriculum years ago for him and his older 2 brothers. (at the time the boys were k-5th...now they are 7th-12th) Calvert is a great time tested school established in 1906!!  I like their thoroughness and they send you EVERYTHING you need.  It is very "newbie" friendly and even has a lot of extra support from professionals, some of which is included and some for an extra fee.  At that time, the curriculum didn't serve my dyslexic son well (and we didn't know he had dyslexia) but they have now developed a curriculum that uses Orton-Gillingham methods.  It looks awesome and I am excited to start home schooling him again!!  They use many resources for kids with learning disabilities....like programs that can read anything to your student so they have the chance to work independently.

This is best I have come up with so far.
I will keep you posted of anything else and hope you do the same!
> 60 days ago

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MimiR
MimiR writes:
The correct response to dyslexia is almost always to REMEDIATE, not to cripple the child for life by just skipping reading.

Except for exceptionally rare cases, dyslexics can become not only adequate but gifted readers.  They just need more instruction--and more grounding in phonics.  I am dyslexic--dyslexic enough that I struggle to spell the name of the street on which I live after three years, and I still can't reliably spell words like "field."  Yet I got an 800 on the English portion of the SAT and am a published author of 6 novels in 8 languages.  My son is seven and is dyslexic.  However, he is now reading on a seventh grade level.

Begin by reading through the dyslexia and reading portions of donpotter.net for background.

I strongly recommend Pollard's Synthetic Readers for teaching reading to a struggling child.  Begin with the Primer, and read the teacher's manual so that you understand how to use the program.  You can find all of Pollard's Readers (Primer, First Synthetic Reader, Second Synthetic Reader, Third Synthetic Reader, and the Advanced Reader) online in Google Books.  The Spellers (Synthetic Speller and Advanced Speller) that go along with them are invaluable.

DO NOT give up on your son's reading.  A diagnosis is NOT a destiny.
> 60 days ago

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JamieCatherine
JamieCather... writes:
My son, who is 8 years old, and my daughter, who is 11 years old, both were diagnosed within a few months of each other early this year with dyslexia.  My daughter also appears to be borderline dyscalculic (extreme difficulty with basic math but capable of learning higher math processes).  My son is also borderline dysgraphic (difficulty writing accurately at speed).  We had not intended to homeschool, but with both being gifted, yet having learning issues, they were struggling in school and getting more and more depressed and unhappy.  We decided we had no real option.  We have decided to use Susan Barton's Homeschool-based Language Arts program.  It is supposed to be very homeschool friendly and specifically designed for dyslexics.  I have heard great things about this program.  We are also on Discovery Streaming Plus (support videos and programs that cover several subjects) and Dreambox (for math) which we signed up for using homeschoolbuyersco-op.org.  The co-op is excellent. Free to join, they have specials all the time, and it gives you access to a tremendous amount of material that frequently individual homeschoolers cannot afford or are not normally allowed access to.  We are still pulling together the rest of our curriculum.  I will be attending a Homeschoolers convention this weekend and will post again when I find additional information.
> 60 days ago

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Slatka
Slatka writes:
Hi! I completely understand what you are feeling.  My daughter was diagnosed with dyslexia and the public school would not acknowledge either.  She was so frustrated and would cry.  She saw that everyone else around her was succeeding and she was not.  It was heartbreaking.  I found help through Christian Cottage Schools.  They empower me as a parents to teach my daughter.  They provide answers through testing, curriculum, teaching strategy, and are amazing with struggling students because they help me as a parent be the education expert.  Christian Cottage helped me learn how to teach my daughter.  She now loves reading and I definitely feel like I have not done her a disservice by homeschooling her. Here is the website www.christiancottage.com
Use the curriculum Learning Rivers.  You will use a metronome to learn to read.  By reading sounds and words to rhythm, you will train the brain to truly master learning quickly and efficiently. Then this mastery will be applied to reading and writing light and humorous stories to rhythm and rhyme. This makes practice fun. Children who work with the metronome can also improve their conversation skills and body language awareness.
 
Note: Your child will have to concentrate to keep up with the rhythm in addition to reading and writing. This causes greater brain activity. Greater brain activity = smarter children.
> 60 days ago

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JamieCatherine
JamieCather... writes:
I had logged in about a month ago, when I was just beginning our homsechooling journey with two dyslexic children.   We are now homeschooling my dyslexic children (8 and just turned 12) full-time.  My 12 year old daughter is using the Susan Barton OG based system for her reading and spelling remediation.  Although it seemed really simplistic and a little silly at first glance, once I delved deeper into the program and actually began using it, it was wonderful, and it is set up so that you the parent can easily be the tutor.  It replaces all language arts curriculum for the first few levels.  Check out her website, take the assessment test for tutoring (takes 5 min. and is free) then view the student assessement a time or two before giving it to your child.  If he passess the auditory assessment (NOT a reading assessment) then he will be able to discern sounds well enough to do her program.  Otherwise, he may need to start with the Lindamood Bell LiPS program, first.  My son has an auditory processing issue with 3 consonant sounds that his original assessment while he was still in school did not catch.  Barton's assessment did.  Therefore, my son is starting with the LiPS system first, then will move on to Barton's system.  I LOVE Barton because it is so clearly laid out for parents to do the teaching through DVD training and a great teacher's manual.  During the school year this spring I had paid more than $800 over a period of a month and half for specialized tutoring for my children and it was breaking us financially.  It also didn't seem to be that effective for their different needs and they hated every minute of it.  We discovered through extensive research that "dyslexia" is a very brough term.  Even though my children are both "dyslexic" they have different strengths and weaknesses.  The specialized tutor was unwilling to modify her program to accomodate their differences and had never heard that different programs might work better with some children than others.  For instance, some children do not function well in black and white material (my son), or that tiny pieces of paper were not concrete enough for my daughter to link to sounds.  We were getting desperate for an answer.  Thankfully, through recommendations on the internet and through friends, we found Barton and the Lindamood Bell system.  Now we don't need to pay out that kind of money each month for private tutoring, I am able to monitor my child's progress myself and the Barton system DOES seem to be helping my daughter.   I really recommend this program.  I have not yet used the LiPS system with my son enough to judge that system yet, since we just received it.  For our other curriculum we are using Math U See, Susan Wise Bauer's The Story of the World, Type to Learn 4, plus a lot of suplementing with Science experiments, History projects, etc. but I will say that I am making some accomodations in the other subjects for now so that the kids are focusing more on learning the material and not spending so much time being frustrated and depressed over their difficulty with reading, spelling and writing.  As we progress in the OG systems, we will add in more independent reading, spelling and writing.  I hope you are doing well and that you have found something that works.  If not, please check out Susan Barton's system for Homeschoolers.  Good luck.
> 60 days ago

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MissionaryMom
MissionaryMom writes:
I am excited to see your post as I too have a dyslexic child and am using Sonlight. I am reading everything I can. It has been discouraging but I believe that there has to be a way. I am determinded that he can read - he is detemined as well. I will be watching this post.
> 60 days ago

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lovemykids3
lovemykids3 writes:
I hope you have found some things to begin working with your child.  I have a 20 year old son who made it through after pulling out of public school, doing some years of homeschooling, and some private, and some technical classes.  It is tough, but keep your focus on how they learn best and surround them with many learning opportunities, creative and hands on learning.  

After raising my two boys, I stopped teaching and began selling Disney vacations.  I know this sounds funny, but now we have another daughter who is 5, in public school and we are beginning the same path again, only this time, we are going to start homeschooling her early.  I was trained in teaching the Barton Reading and spelling program when I was still working in the schools.  I highly recommend it.  It is a wonderful program.

Here is the other thing I want to share with all the people raising learners that need to know we are truly interested in how they learn and helping keep learning exciting and engaging.  Disney has an incredible program that I would love to tell you about that allows you to enroll your child in hands on learning at the parks.  Up close learning with animals at Animal Kingdom, chemistry, physics with roller coasters, history in Magic Kingdom, and so much more I can't begin to share it here.  Many agents won't share because their is no commission in these tickets, but from one mom of a dyslexic family to others, it is an exciting way to engage their minds and share opportunities to show them how much they can do, just differently.  And, to share all the wonderful famous, creative people who think like they do, including Walt!  If you want more information please email me at goodnessvacations@gmail.com.  I work for an earmarked agency and it cost nothing extra to talk with me, or if you want to book with me, I would love to engage the kids in the planning, it is a great homeschool project.

Keep heart, and push on, it is so worth it.  My 20 year old has gotten in to two different colleges as he is trying to figure out what he really wants to do.  They will make!
> 60 days ago

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Sonyia17
Sonyia17 writes:
Hi, I have a 10 year old dyslexic boy with Aspergers. I also took him out of school at the last term last year, as they were not able to accommodate his needs. I also believed he would not be able to read. I was also reading ALL his work to him. I found something wonderful that is FREE its called NATURAL READER. I also use Time4Learning EXCELLENT and NOT expensive this covers everything from grade R-10. I did find that he was not getting enough phonics so I have now got CLINKnKIDS. All the programs are self paced (you MUST have) for the "off" days. They give you everything from reports to work that needs attention. For math I recommend IXL. Here are some other sites to look at. I recommend you don't do the same mistake I made and have so many, check them out and you decide what's best for your child. TURTLE DAIRY - EDHELPER - STARFALL - ADAPTED MIND - TALKING FINGERS. Good luck. YOU CAN DO IT.
> 60 days ago

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Colettee
Colettee writes:
Hi - I have homeschooled my dyslexic daughter for 8 years now.  I found out she was dyslexic in 3rd grade (currently in 7th grade).  The best things I ever used for her in order of importance:  1.  Brain Integration Therapy by Dianne Craft.  We have used it for 1 1/2 years  every day except in the summer and finally saw a breakthrough last month when she finally could read her history and science by herself and understand the meaning of the questions by herself. 2.  Abeka language arts program.  Start with the 1st grade if you have never used it before.  We started it in 3rd grade and took her back to the 1st grade to start the program.  It had the right amount of repetition for her that other programs didn't have.  Even the Calvert I am using right now that is specifically for dyslexics is not as good as I have found the Abeka to be.  I would just add a few "dyslexic" tricks to the abeka like "rainbow writing" and "sky writing".   Hope this is helpful. I think without the Brain Training we would still be hating school every morning.  Now we welcome it because we can actually succeed at it.
> 60 days ago

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whiddledd
whiddledd writes:
absolutely the number one reading program  is Edmark. I have 8 children and I have homeschooled all of them successfully. but my 8th born is a daughter who is dyslexic and has a strong learning disability. She is now 12 years old. I had tried everything and in the third grade she was still not reading. someone told me about the Edmark Reading Program and showed me a sample of it and my daughter I was reading after the first lesson. I purchased Edmark 1 and completed all the lessons. we then purchased Edmark 2. these programs 1&2 are 1 hundred dollars apiece. well worth every penny and my daughter loved them. now when it comes to math take my word for it. I have seen everything out there for dyslexia and a learning disability and the number one choice is Teaching Textbooks. You can view samples of this  grade levels 1 - 8  that are available online. they also have available testing so you can figure out which grade level to purchase for your child. I am currently looking for a English program that is a similar style to  Edmark and Teaching Textbooks if anybody out there can recommend one. Good luck.
> 60 days ago

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summerreader
summerreader writes:
Try a program called Reading Horizons.  It is amazing and very supportive as well as incredibly effective!
> 60 days ago

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BTS09Shoop
BTS09Shoop writes:
Be patient with your child and use all the sense in your body to learn and retain.  hooked on phonics did not work for me.  Using all learning types did. I still struggle in my adult life with new information or words I don't know. Sight, hear, sound back vocal, comprend each new word and say it hear it repeat it and now write it as you say it write it again to comprehend it. now the word in a sentence.it is build your brain one cell at a time use all learning structions .Use all of your senses sight, hear, listen, feel, vocal repeat the word and wright the word.Fun ways, is also tasting the word or topic of reading. Lemons are tart,and sour. taste will help comprehend and visualize a puckered face helps the visual kinect and cognitive thinking.  I am dyslexic and have trouble still on new knowledge.   Positive learning worked for me and yes i was very trying as a child.   ASk for an IEP the school district.it  takes time but most school and state have a time period of three to six months to have the testng done at the schooldistrict, and the Dr. results wil be useful too.
> 60 days ago

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MissionaryMom
MissionaryMom writes:
My son was diagnosed with dyslexia two years ago. Homeschooling him was the best thing we could have done. We used Barton Reading and Spelling to help teach him how to read. It uses the Orton- Gillingham approach and is very parent friendly. We used Sonlight for history, science and for the excellent books this program provides. We read to him as he was learning to read on his own. When we started he was 11 and reading on a end of year 2nd grade level. We are still working on it but in one year he is reading on a end of year 4th grade level! I will not lie to you it is expensive...but worth every penny.
> 60 days ago

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StillSmiling
StillSmiling writes:
I am a homeschooling mother, and I felt really hopeless when  my eight year old daughter, couldn't even tell the difference between the letters b and d.  We had tried everything!

I was losing confidence in my ability to homeschool, and my daughter was beginning to feel like she was "stupid" compared to other kids her age.  What really upset her was the fact that her younger sister was reading "real books" and she was left behind.

So trudged through a mountain of phonics workbooks.  We bought learning DVDs.  We played online reading games.  I tried new curricula, but nothing solved the root problem: symbol confusion.

But one day I gave up trying to teach Anna myself and hired a reading tutor.  After working with Anna for a while the teacher turned to me and said, "Honey, your little girl has Dyslexia.  These typical workbooks are useless."

At first I felt like there was no hope, and there was something wrong with my child.   But soon I realized that I had a very gifted child in my house...who needed serious help.  I learned everything I could about Dyslexia, including all the current research, available therapies, and brain development options.  

I looked into Dyslexia Therapy, willing to try anything, I just wanted Anna to learn to read.  Sadly, our family did not have hundreds of dollars to spend.  I was determined to help her myself.  After much research and time working with my daughter I began to put together a therapy designed just for her.  That is when Dyslexia Games was born.   I was solving a wonderful mystery that would eventually help many children to overcome their struggles with Dyslexia, without the high costs of traditional therapy.
> 60 days ago

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RShey
RShey writes:
I just stumbled across this post and had to respond that there is a solution to help your child! Check out the website www.diannecraft.org and read about her Brain Training Therapy completed at home by the parent using her therapy manual. She also has a reading program for struggling reader and I can say it works! Initially I questioned how in the world is this going to work but we perservered and are seeing the huge positive results! Look into the writing eight exercise she offers and discusses in the therapy manual to correct dyslexic tendendies. In extreme cases you just have to do the therapy longer. Her typical results are 2 years grade level improvement in 1 year.  My son is dyslexic, dysgraphia, and auditory processing disorder and we are doing all Dianne Craft advises in her program and it is changing our lives (slowly, but life changing for my son's long term success). Now, it has been the hardest, tear provoking process for me mostly and hard for my son as this is exercising all his weak areas. But I just keep pushing us through week after week of the exercises and brain training because it works! and the changes have been remarkable. My son is also color blind and to my relief the program still works with him. Also check out Child1st Publications word picture cards.  My son loves these and they WORK! The sight words stick in his memory now and before, not at all. I am also looking into music therapy for auditory processing issue to expedite his attention/focus as that has been a huge issue for him and most likely why this whole process has been extra difficult for us both. Also do a google search for learning abled kids and she has a video on her site about what it is like to be dyslexic. Really gave me perspective and senitivity toward my son as we go through this journey of learning to read.
> 60 days ago

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nicolazs
nicolazs writes:
Do check out the guided reading program for kids from Snap! Learning. It is on Sale for homeschoolers now.
Resources:
> 60 days ago

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andygudge
andygudge writes:
I am Dr Andy Gudgeon, living in Manila, Philippines, after teaching in the UK for 35 years. I married a filipina girl of 23 in 2000, but when our son was 5, he was diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome, after "freezing" in every subject at a very fine school. The diagnosis is certain, done by a very highly regarded educational psychiatrist, who stayed with him all day every day for a week. I started reading and learning all I could, but by age 9, it was hopeless. Then I realised my wife's erratic behaviour was also Aspergers, and when our daughter reached 10, I saw it again. At that point, I pulled our son out of school, and have done home schooling with him since then. We both love that, and he is far ahead of other boys his age now. I have developed many resources for him, and learned a great deal, which I am happy to share. I am hoping to create a mini-school for Aspergers kids in UK from next year, probably in Sheffield. I can teach all the maths, physics, chemistry, biology, English, and even French & German, up to age 18, and I will collect a group of mums (maybe dads?) to build interactive social skills, with things like, quizzes, competitions, walking, camping, caravanning, caving, painting, drawing, sports. Anybody near Sheffield welcome to join. Anybody else ... why not try it yourself? So here is my email add  andygudgy@gmail.com and feel free to chat with me there. Aspie women have major meltdowns, which I have suffered from greatly ... does anybody want to sew the buttons back on all my shirts?  After the last one, she suddenly decided I have another wife somewhere, and also that my study table was untidy, and ran away, but I am strong enough to cope with all this, and I will spend ten years preparing my 2 dear aspies for life. My wife's response was to go into DENIAL, which is a disastrous thing for the kids, but still it is a part of the Aspie character. OK over to you. Andy
> 60 days ago

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andygudge
andygudge writes:
Please read below, but I have taught "dyslexic' children for many years, for FREE, because absolutely do not believe it exists. If you will email me, i will send you some sheets which will remove it from his life.
> 60 days ago

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