enything4him
enything4him asks:
Q:

What school programs are available to help my autistic son?

My son was diagnosed with autism last year in pre-k by the school psychatrist. I did not receive any information to help me understand what autism is. I am still trying to find out information on my own. He goes to public school and is in a special needs class, he has speech theraphy twice a week but is still not talking. He does sometimes say some words. Are there programs that the school district should provide for my son. I am a single working class mother. I do not receive any assistance for my son because I have a job. He also has sickle cell disease.  If you have any info. that would be helpful please help.
In Topics: Autism & Aspergers Syndrome
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Autism Society of America
Apr 2, 2008
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What the Expert Says:

There are many resources, informational materials, and sources of support available that may be beneficial to you.  
There is much free information available on our website, http://www.Autism-Society.org, on autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and navigating life with autism.  Information & Referral staff are available to answer additional questions and provide additional support and direction to help empower parents, the public, and all members of the autism community, info@autism-society.org  Additionally, there are materials on educational issues available to download for free http://www.Autism-Society.org/downloads  A leading source of information for parents on special education law and IEP issues is Wright's Law, http://www.WrightsLaw.org
It may be most helpful to speak with other parents of children with ASD that have been successfully navigating many issues at one of our Local or State Chapters, networking with other parents is always the best way to learn, from the experiences of others http://www.Autism-Society.org/Chapters  This would also be a good place to learn about possible state and local resources for yourself and your son.  
There are many other organizations that may also be helpful, some of which we have partnered with, http://www.Autism-Society.org/community_partners  
I hope that this information is helpful.  It can be difficult at times learning to navigate services and living with your child's autism.  Support is available and there are effective treatments for autism.  I hope that as you educate yourself and become involved with the autism community you feel empowered for yourself and your son.  

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Additional Answers (6)

moonflwr613
moonflwr613 writes:
the school does what they have to. You should contact student services to see what can be offered in the school to all students. the school board might have an offical test that needs to be done so that he can be diagnosed as special needs and that should open up more doors for help.
> 60 days ago

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LouiseSattler
LouiseSattler , Child Professional writes:
I have added a list of very informative websites for you below (in addition to the excellent resources provided by fellow posters).  You can also find support networks for parents where you can reach out to people in your area via some of these websites.  This one site is fun for children:  http://www.zacbrowser.com  and has links for parents to network.  The site is interactive and meant to engage a child with autism.


Good luck!

Louise Masin Sattler
Nationally Certified School Psychologist
Owner of Signing Families
http://www.SigningFamilies.com

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missyreed30
missyreed30 writes:
look into a program called EEE Early Essential Education. It helped my son. he goes to kindergarten this fall. also try sign language a tape called SIGNING TIME will help u n him learn the language fast. and he will communicate with u also using pictures of all words. create a binder of pictures in lamination( for cleanliness) when he canttell u the word he can point at the picture. ur library will have the tape for u or u can ask about it with ur special ed coordinator.  good luck.
> 60 days ago

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joseph6426
joseph6426 writes:
your son sounds identical to my grandson,except he is 5years old.this year he is in a life skills class.
,but i think he needs more.waiting for his end of school meeting to see where he will be next year.he goes to therapy 2 times a week,and still doesn't talk much.i am very concerned,i don't think he is getting what he needs.we help his mom which is our ex daughter in law.
.our son(his dad)doesnt even see him,(so this is already a bad situation).if i was making decisions for him i would be getting him in the easter seales program which is about 30 miles from us.they have a lot of programs for kids with disabilities,he also started t ball today/although he spent most of the time laying on the ground crying.hang in there and just have a lot of patience with him,(these kids are wonderful and such a blessing)hang in there!
> 60 days ago

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shine0853
shine0853 writes:
I suggest you type "human services/social services" and  "Special Education" education for the town/state you live in if you have a specific need. Otherwise get a notebook, keep track of all calls and dates. Sounds like you will have a long rad. No one gives answers unless you ask the right questions. Affiliate yourself with a support group of Mom's who have kids with aspergers...you will find frustration/lnlieness for both you and your son and will need a 'good support' system....my son now 20, single from conception.
15 days ago

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john18967
john18967 writes:
This book provides easy to understand information for parents, teachers, and other professionals working with individuals on the Autism Spectrum. It is important for people to understand that there are steps that need to be accomplished prior to attempting and succeeding at the next step. This book really opened my mind to understanding the difficulties involved with oral motor deficits and how many areas it can impact.

Teachers ESPECIALLY need to understand how sensory issues affect development and ability to function - please please please read this!!
I cannot emphasize enough the hope this book has given me for my 12 year old son. This book explains what an oral-motor program is with case summaries of boys with autism who have school programs. The items to use and how to do it are all detailed within the pages of this book.

It is described in detail what the various techniques will achieve for the child with feeding issues and lack of imitation or initiating speech sounds. This should be done both in the home and school and can be practiced with teacher, therapist or aide at school and be a program for all students. This can easily be adapted into the school schedule and photos can help the nonverbal child know what is expected.

I highly recommend this book and wish it was around 9 or 10 years ago when my child was younger. I liked that the photos and case summaries are of boys in the age range of my son who is 12. There is help for the child that stuffs food in their mouth, and cannot tolerate new foods. This is a quick read of only 121 pages. You will need a highlighter with this book

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