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Mika
Mika asks:
Q:

Are schools and teachers prepared for the rise in autism?

I would love to know others thoughts on if schools and teachers are addressing how to best serve children on the autistic spectrum.
In Topics: Working with my child's teacher(s), Autism & Aspergers Syndrome
> 60 days ago

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Expert

lkauffman
Jun 15, 2007
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What the Expert Says:

Like most things, the answer to your question depends on who you ask. In my experience, there is quite a bit of support for parents of children who are on the more "severe" end of the Autism spectrum, whether it is from the school and special education services provided under Individual with Disabilities Education Act OR from state-funded organizations, such as local Regional Centers (California state-funded non-profits geared toward assisting children with developmental disabilities up to age 18). Children who meet criteria for special education or the Regional Center are, therefore, entitled to a number of wonderful services. However, children with Aspergers or PDD NOS often do not meet criteria and have less access to services. Sooooo, I personally feel that, as the definition of autism has expanded and evolved, there are a number of children who will be diagnosed and who will struggle with access to services.

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natunix
Oct 12, 2007
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Best Answer!

what's this?
from a fellow member
So far, I have had excellent luck with my son's special ed programs...but I know more people who havenot been as fortunate.  Many of their children are in classes where they treat it as a daycare instead of a learning environment.  From observation, this is mainly in areas where funding is not available to properly teach autistic children.  It is very disheartening.

My son is in first grade and is now mostly mainstreamed with help of his sped team who are in the classroom, but helps everyone so my son doesn't feel different or isolated.  The OT comes in and does writing exercises with the entire class also, so that my son doesn't have to leave the class.  Everyone benefits.

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Additional Answers (5)

teacher_jolie
teacher_jolie writes:
I am a first year special education teacher. &nbsp;I have 2nd - 4th graders in my classroom. &nbsp;I can not speak for everyone but I do not think that most schools are prepared for children with autism. &nbsp;I feel that many general education teachers do not know enough about special needs students and how to provide the best possible services for them.<br />
> 60 days ago

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Uzo123
Uzo123 writes:
yes
> 60 days ago

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webinit
webinit writes:
I dont know about all of the schools but i do know about the one my daughter attends and in my opinion the answer is no. My daughter was an honor student through middle school and when she got to high school, they changed her IEP and she is failing all of her classes. I am to attend another IEP meeting today and i am so fed up i may not even go.
> 60 days ago

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webinit
webinit writes:
I dont know about all of the schools but i do know about the one my daughter attends and in my opinion the answer is no. My daughter was an honor student through middle school and when she got to high school, they changed her IEP and she is failing all of her classes. I am to attend another IEP meeting today and i am so fed up i may not even go.
> 60 days ago

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HeatherPeterson124
HeatherPete... writes:
Teachers should be prepared for the ever-changing needs and demands when it comes to matters like this. Also, I think it's great that many teachers are now taking their online education degrees.

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