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Julietta-az
Julietta-az asks:
Q:

I have a student in my class that doesn't process what I'm asking him.

Every time that this student breaks a classroom rule, I ask him why he is he breaking that specific rule, and his answer is always the rule itself. Today he was making fun of one of his classmates and I ask him to tell me what was going on, why was he making fun of one of his friends when he knows that this is not allowed. And his answer to my question was "I'm not supposed to make fun of my friends" and I told him " i already know that" "you are telling my the rule" instead of telling my the reason of braking it. After spending few minutes on trying to explain him in different ways that all I want it to hear was why he was braking the rule, I've tried having my assistant talk to him, and she tried many different ways with no success. I decided to give him few minutes on the "thinking chair" for him to relax and think about the action and the response he was giving us. Few minutes after I asked him again, why are you braking the rule? And he had give me the same response " the rule itself". I talked to his parents about this behavior and they only said that he is a stuburn and that he loves to act silly. I'm already frustrated with him and with myself because I've had try some many ways to motivate him to redirect him and nothing works. He is a 5 years old prekindergarten student, and this behavior occurs in a daily basis and every single time that he breaks a class or playground rule. I need some help, I don't know what else to do!!!!!
In Topics: Discipline and behavior challenges
> 60 days ago

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linda.theappletree
linda.theap... writes:
I would say to have this child evaluated immediately.  It appears that he might have a learning disability that will continue to affect him, and you and the class, negatively, unless he gets treatment.
> 60 days ago

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cynthiacirilo
cynthiacirilo writes:
I'm a psychology student, I think before you label him, you should evaluate his family context, his language habilities, and other aspects that if you have an educational psychologist at school, she or he must give you some advices and must evaluate him with some tests.

Good luck, :)
> 60 days ago

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lindamariethienel
lindamariet... writes:
it may be he is not being challenged in his work and therefore may be bored,  or the work assignment may be too difficult for him to understand and therefore is a bit on the defiant side.  Let him know that he is important in your class and that you want him to be your helper or leader for the group .  you might sit three or four students that do well with him in a small group, so that he will see what is expected of him and you as teacher will see if he is capable of the work at the level he is in or perhaps he needs more individual attention to understand. Continue with this technique until he realizes that he will be a leader and leaders needs to behave to help others.
> 60 days ago

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Mr.Cloud
Mr.Cloud writes:
My best answer is that he is probably doing this to mess with you or confuses you in order to get out of trouble or mess with you I'm a student and there was a kid that was extremely smart. He would always do things to confuses the teacher to get out of trouble or mess with them for his and the classes amusement. I say just handle it like you would anouthor student take away privileges such as playing on playground or game time instead makeing him do other things like helping you or another student my only other guess is does he have friends try to get him a friend that he might be trying to gain through what he is doing it at 5 he might not relise that what he is doing is not fun for the other person as he finds it fun other than that I'm sorry can't help
> 60 days ago

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historynut
historynut writes:
try asking him how he thanks someome feels if they are made fun of, or if would like it if someone did that to him most pre-K students don't understand the action of what thy're doing. give this I try-
> 60 days ago

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debbyhoo
debbyhoo writes:
Sometimes trouble maker students have problems in their home. Maybe they just simply searching for attention since their are too busy or don't have close relationship with them. Maybe there's siblings rivalry at home or some other emotional problems at home which they cannot express to their parents. And as a result, they channel their negative energy to their peers and teachers; challenging rules and authorities. I think you need yo approach the child personnaly to find out what his real problem is and it would be useful to communicate with his parents too. Besides, you need to check the real condition in his home because sometimes parents are not too open too.
> 60 days ago

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