Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus
Anonymous
Anonymous asks:
Q:

Is it really necessary to teach children under the age of 10 about drugs?

My second grade daughter's elementary school recently had a drug education week that included a different school-wide activity each day, including having the children sign a "Pledge to be Drug Free" document, wear their shirts and backpacks backward ("Turn Your Back on Drugs Day"), and hang ribbons on the school's fences, etc. Parents were not given the curriculum being used in the classroom in advance, and it's not clear to me (yet) if the event was organized by the PTA, school leadership or the district.

Regardless, I wasn't expecting to have to have this kind of discussion with my daughter this early in her education. In fact, she didn't even know what "drugs" were when I was preparing her for the week at school.

Have drugs really become such a problem in public schools now that we need to start propagandizing to children under the age of 10? What is the focus of anti-drug education this early? Any messaging parents should be using at home to complement the learning without scaring our children (or giving them information that will be too complicated for them -- like the politics of the drug war; illegal vs. legal drugs, and use vs. abuse)?

Thanks for any insights you can offer.
In Topics: School and Academics, My child's growth and development, Communicating with my child (The tough talks)
> 60 days ago

|

Expert

Wayne Yankus
Nov 16, 2009
Subscribe to Expert

What the Expert Says:

Sounds a little over the top for second grade.  However, many of these children have older siblings and see what they sometimes do.  The real message for this age group is about "good drugs vs. bad drugs"  Drugs your parents and doctors give you can heal sickness or make you feel better.  Never accept drugs from some one other than a trusted parent etc...  Discussing things like vitamins, acetominophen for fevers second graders do understand. My state requires a panel of parents, educators, and members of the community be involved in drug and family life class planning.  You may want to suggest a similar panel.

Wayne Yankus, MD, FAAP
expert panelist: pediatrics



Did you find this answer useful?
3
yes
0
no

Additional Answers (4)

Sheila3
Sheila3 writes:
I teach a whole unit on drug prevention to my preschoolers.  2 is not to young.  It is called 'Healthy Alternatives for Little Ones'.  It teaches the importance of not taking medicine on your own, not drinking alcohol or smoking.  I don't use the word bad or wrong, but teach the children that those things are never ok for children.  Children need to learn at a young age that sometimes they will be ask to make choices and that those choices need to be healthy choices.  They have a chance to 'play act'  good guys and bad guys, someone from school offers you a pill, or has a gun or cigarette, what would you do or say.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
4
yes
0
no
New'New
New'New , Student writes:
I don't see how this can be a problem? Most parents want the school to do more about being drug-free, I think this is a very good thing to take this from such a young age so that they can be aware. I think they are thinking it's either now or never because at thins age students are more to listen, than when they are 10 years old you have to really think about where they are coming from with this instead of thinking about the bad things about most schools would not even achknolegde it be proud that your daughter is so egrer to learn what is not so good about drugs!!!!!
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
3
yes
1
no
Relle
Relle , Student writes:
Yes, I do think that is a bit young.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
1
yes
1
no
kjj1234
kjj1234 writes:
I don't see how it can hurt. Honestly schools need to take a part in drug prevention too , because many parents don't.  Many parents shelter their kids and wait until it is to late. I think talk about drugs  should start early and often (discussing what a child can understand at that age). I want my children to be prepared for life and I want my messages to be stuck in their heads. One conversation won't do that. It will take multiple conversations over the course of their childhood.  I monitor what my kids watch on tv very closely, but I know they might hear things on tv or from older siblings when they are at friends homes. Many tv shows depict drugs and alcohol abuse as being funny and acceptable. I want my kids to hear about drugs and alcohol from me first, so there are no misconceptions for them.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
Answer this question
Anonymous
Welcome!
Please sign in.
Not a Member? Join now!