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education.com asks:
Q:

How can I help my visual learner read?

"She is 7 years old in grade two, and teacher says she visual learner and has a learning disability. What can I do at home to help her?"

Asked by Crystal in commenting on the article, "Helping Visual Learners Succeed": http://www.education.com/magazine/article/Helpi...
In Topics: Helping my child with reading, Learning styles and differences, Learning disabilities
> 60 days ago

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hlevitan
hlevitan , Teacher writes:
Crystal,

It is great that you know your daughter learns best as a visual learner.  You can spend time reading picture books with her.  Viewing the illustrations and the text with her will help enforce the meaning of the text.  As you read together, it may be helpful to follow your finger under the words so she can identify the sounds with the words. Reading together is a great activity, because it will allow you to model fluent reading, and you will also give her the opportunity to read with your guided support.

Since your daughter has a learning disability, she may have a more difficult time processing the information she reads.  As you read together, it is important that you help her understand the text by discussing the story.  Share your reactions to the book, and perhaps discuss what occurs in the story during and after you read.  Discussing the story will help her better understand it, and it will also teach her how to process the meaning of the words she reads.

Here is an article that provides reading help for visual learners:
"Reading Help for Struggling Gifted Visual-Spatial Learners: Wholes and Patterns"
http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Staying_Awake_During/

Happy reading and best wishes!

Hayley
> 60 days ago

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MrsReading
MrsReading , Child Professional, Teacher, Parent writes:
I think you should go back and ask for a lot more clarification. What EXACTLY does the teacher mean when she says 'visual learner'? In addition, has you daughter been tested for a learning disability? I've taught in schools for over 20 years and I can say, with all honesty, that many, many children with these labels are nothing more than curriculum impaired by schools taking a 'one size fits all' approach to education.
> 60 days ago

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smallmeans
smallmeans writes:
My entire life I felt stupid and always struggled in school.  I was actually held back in the 2nd grade because I was behind in reading.  I have been diagnosed with "learning disabilities" particularly with reading comprehension.
A few years ago I felt very strongly that I should go back to school and was terrified, I always felt like an idiot.  Instead, I realized that it had nothing to do with my intelligence but how I was being taught.  I also am a visual and kinetic learner.  Now, at 31, I hope to change the education system to cater to students needs instead of focusing on their terms.  
As for helping your child, I found it helpful while reading to have a lot of different colors to highlight different subjects.  It would help me understand better what I was reading.  Since they are only in second grade I had an idea about printing children's book where the noun, adjectives, verbs, etc. all were in separate colors (i.e. red for nouns).  So that they would be able to distinguish them better.  You could probably write your own short stories, or have her write them and draw pictures ;)
Also, I know that Waldorf (a private school, which does a lot of art) doesn't stress reading at an early age as necessary, and try to teach when they are ready.  I know some students don't learn to read until 3rd grade but it does not affect their reading level.  Just some thoughts :)
> 60 days ago

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