Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus
Black Friday sale on now! Save 50% on PLUS and Brainzy with coupon BLACKFRI. Learn More
awells2003
awells2003 asks:
Q:

My four year old daughter is throwing tantrums daily at school!

My four year old daughter is in pre-k. She has been throwing tantrums at school almost every day and im afraid they are going to make me take her out. I have tried soo many things, I am at my wits end! She is a smart girl and is great at her school work. At home I can tell her to stop acting up and walk away, but at school she screams and disrupts her class and other classes. It scares the other children too. I just don't know what else to do. I am on a waiting list to take her to a child psychologist, but until then i am completely scared of it continuing or getting worse. She can be the sweetest girl and then something so simple will set her off. Please help!
In Topics: Discipline and behavior challenges
> 60 days ago

|

Expert

Dr.Monika
Jan 25, 2013
Subscribe to Expert

What the Expert Says:

Temper tantrums should stop at about age 4 years.  If they don't or they escalate at any time, a child should seek an evaluation by a psychologist.  Does your daughter have mood swings?  Is she aggressive?  Is there family history of bipolar disorder or any other mental health problem?  A psychologist will help you in getting a diagnosis and recommend treatment.

Best regards.
Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no

Additional Answers (2)

AshBau
AshBau , Teacher writes:
While you await your appointment with the psychologist, see if the school psychologist can come in and observe her to see if she is doing this for attention from the teacher. Also, my suggestion would be to work with the teacher and try a time system for her to participate in then have a break. Also, maybe the way the teacher presents the direction is confusing for your daughter. See if you can pair her up with a peer to follow the correct behavior as well as complete the day smoothly. Hopefully this will help or you already found your answer.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
Safioleas
Safioleas writes:
An alternate angle to view the problem is to assess the classroom and the teacher.  If this is completely foreign behavior for her, perhaps there is some manner of issue between her and her instructor(s) that she is incapable of relating to you.  Interview the teacher, ask loads of questions, volunteer at the school as much as possible.  It could be that some communication failure has occurred between the two parties that you can clear up with a little parental detective work.  The first thing to remember is that you have to trust your child and your instincts regarding your child.  No one else will have her best interest the way you do.  Switching schools (and teachers), waiting a year for her to mature a little more, or simply discussing these issues with her and her teacher together may help.  Do not dismiss her behavior as having no basis until you have all the facts.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
Answer this question