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The Common Roles of Fathers (page 4)

By — University of Florida IFAS Extension
Updated on Dec 16, 2008

The Five Ps: Is That All There Is?

While the "The Five Ps" can be a simple guide for categorizing ways that fathers are commonly involved in their child's life, there's no need to restrict your role as a father to these 5 categories. However, the diverse nature of activities fathers are involved in today tend to fit, more or less, into one of the five Ps. For example, if a father acts as a primary caretaker for his children, the activities he engages in will fit into all 5 categories. Activities such as feeding, bathing, and transporting all fit into the expanding definition of a father's provider role. The benefits of this expanded involvement are clear for both the child and the father (see: "The Hidden Benefits of Being an Involved Father" Florida Cooperative Extension Service, IFAS, Univ. Fla., Gainesville FCS2137 http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/HE137 ). Fathers who look for a variety of ways to be involved in their child's life contribute to a healthier family and a healthier future for their child.

References

Gordon, A., & Browne, K.W. (1996). Guiding young children in a diverse society. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Jain, A., Belsky, J. & Crnic. K. (1996). Beyond fathering behaviors: Types of dads. Journal of Family Psychology, 10, 431-442.

Kazura, K. (2000). Fathers qualitative and quantitative involvement: An investigation of attachment, play, and social interactions. The Journal of Mens Studies, 91, 41-57.

Marsiglio, W., Amato, P., Day, R.D., & Lamb, M.E. (2000). Scholarship on fatherhood in the 1990s and beyond. Journal of Marriage & the Family, 62, 1173-1191.

Marsiglio, W. (1995). Fatherhood: Contemporary theory, research, and social policy. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Palkovitz, R. (2002). Involved fathering and child development: Advancing our understanding of good fathering. In C.S. Tamis-LeMonda & N. Cabrera (Eds.), Handbook of father involvement: Multidisciplinary perspectives. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum (pp. 119-140).

Parke, R.D., McDowell, D.J., Kim, M., Killian, C., Dennis, J., Flyr, M.L., & Wild, M.N. (2002). Fathers contributions to childrens peer relationships. In C.S. Tamis-LeMonda & N. Cabrera (Eds.), Handbook of father involvement: Multidisciplinary perspectives. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum (pp. 141-167).

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