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Transition Resources for Students with Specific Disabilities (page 3)

By — National Dissemination Center for Children With Disabilities
Updated on Feb 17, 2011

Mental Health Issues

  • Handling your psychiatric disability in work and school.
    www.bipolarworld.net/job_school/js27.htm
    If you have a psychiatric condition, you may wish to visit this interactive and informative web site that addresses issues and reasonable accommodations related to work and school. This site claims to be "the only site designed exclusively to provide information about the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other employment and education issues for people with psychiatric disabilities."
  • Supported employment for individuals with mental illnesses.
    www.mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/cmhs/communitysupport/toolkits/employment/
    Supported Employment is a well-defined approach to helping people with mental illnesses find and keep competitive employment within their communities. Supported employment programs are staffed by employment specialists who have frequent meetings with treatment providers to integrate supported employment with mental health services. The National Mental Health Information Center offers indepth guidance on supported employment for individuals with mental health issues.
  • And what about higher education?
    www.heath.gwu.edu/PDFs/PamPsyc..pdf
    This 11-page guide discusses academic adjustments needed to support students with psychiatric disabilities in postsecondary educational settings.

Mental Retardation / Developmental Disabilities

  • Career exploration for students with mental retardation.
    www.seattleu.edu/ccts/curriculum/Student%20Self-Directed%20Career%20Exploration.html
    This online resource is called Student Self-Directed Career Exploration: A Curriculum for Students with Mental Retardation. It provides a guided process that students can use to map out their personal network, their areas of interest and skill, and an action plan for career exploration.
  • Pursuing postsecondary education.
    www.heath.gwu.edu/Inteldisabilities.htm
    The Consortium for Students With Intellectual Disabilities is an exciting new project to promote postsecondary success for students with intellectual disabilities. Read all about the Consortium at the link above, and connect with several databases you can search to identify postsecondary programs for students with intellectual disabilities.

Special Health Care Needs

  • What does health have to do with transition? Everything!
    www.ncset.org/publications/viewdesc.asp?id=2967
    This Parent Brief provides information on the benefits of and strategies for including health in the Individualized Education Program (IEP) process.
  • The American Academy of Pediatrics, on adolescents transitioning to adult health care.
    http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/98/6
    /1203?ijkey=f19a8e88edbad0a84421d76471b57faa31d16500

    This policy statement describes how the pediatrician can work closely with patients with special health care needs and their families as an advocate and educator to help them adapt positively to an adult-focused system of health care. Issues in health care transitions including independence and dependence, education and vocational issues, insurance issues and limitations, Social Security, and hospitalization are outlined.
  • MUST VISIT: The Healthy and Ready to Work National Center!
    www.hrtw.org/index.html
    If you have special health care needs, or are working with a youth who does, HRTW is the place to come for this specialized transition information. HRTW focuses on understanding systems, access to quality health care, and increasing the involvement of youth. It also includes provider preparation plus tools and resources needed to make more informed choices. Categories under which information is organized are:

    • Systems and services.
      www.hrtw.org/systems/index.html
      This section of HRTW's website contains materials on using Title V to facilitate the development of HRTW/transition systems for children, youth, and young adults with special health care needs and their families.
    • Youth involvement.
      www.hrtw.org/youth/index.html
      This section of HRTW's website will connect you with all manner of youth materials, with the overarching purpose of making sure that youth are involved in their own decision making and transition plans.
    • Tools & solutions.
      www.hrtw.org/tools/index.html
      Here, you'll find web-based tools, resources, and strategies that can be used by youth and their families, health care providers, and state and local agencies to achieve successful transition from pediatric to adult health care.
    • Health care.
      www.hrtw.org/healthcare/index.html
      Health care is obviously a top priority for youth with special health care needs as they transition from pediatric to adult services. Choose this door in HRTW's website and walk into a giant library of resources on the subject.

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

  • Postsecondary ed options.
    www.heath.gwu.edu/PDFs/Brain%20Injury.pdf
    This 16-page guide looks at the characteristics of TBI and how these affect students in postsecondary educational settings. Suggestions are included for students, parents and family members, instructors, academic advisors, and disability support services personnel as to how to help students with TBI achieve goals in higher education.
  • School to work.
    www.biausa.org/publications/schooltowork.htm
    This discussion of TBI and moving from adolescence to adulthood comes from the Brain Injury Association of America (BIA).
  • Two more from the Brain Injury Association.
    Both of these resources deal with issues you might find helpful in transition planning when TBI is a factor.
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