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Hillside Learning & Behavior Center

Preschool | Grades K-12 | Allegan Area ESA
212 Grove St
Allegan, MI 49010
(269) 673-2167

About This School

Hillside Learning & Behavior Center is located in Allegan, MI and is one of 3 schools in Allegan Area Esa School District. It is a sp-ed school that serves 100 students in grades K-12.

Special Education schools are public schools that provide special services for children with disabilities (special physical, mental, or learning needs). Many special education schools also provide vocational training, adapted physical education, and assistive technology for their students. See Hillside Learning & Behavior Center's test results to learn more about school performance.

In 2011, Hillside Learning & Behavior Center had 7 students for every full-time equivalent teacher. The Michigan average is 18 students per full-time equivalent teacher.

Student Ethnicity (2011)

Students (2011)

100

Students Per Teacher (2011)

Female/Male (2011)

28% 72%

Subsidized Lunch (2011)

65%
eligible

District Spending (2010)

$132,261
per student
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Hillside Learning & Behavior Center Reviews

Putting a  special needs student in a police car is NOT APPROPRIATE!

By on

My wife and I are both occupational therapist with 25 years Plus of experience working with special needs children. I was working IN a school district a year before the Education for the Handicapped Act went in force PL 94-142.  

My wife was appalled to read the article in the Huffington Post as well.

We all get angry.  Acting out our anger inappropriately is the problem that society has a problem with.  

Special Needs Children are no different in that aspect.  

A Public School with the Name :  

Hillside Learning and Behavior Center  

are mandated to provide an appropriate education which includes modifying a child's inappropriate behavior.   They have protocols for behavior management specific to each child that the parents sign off on in the IEP.

Just like everyone else in the world, there is a reason why they get angry.  Events, environment, noise, people, frustration, or a full diaper can trigger anger and the resultant appropriate or inappropriate behaviors.  It is the MISSION of all the staff to identify those and help the child behave appropriately in response to those triggers.  Some are easy but many are very complex issues that are extremely challenging for parents and educators. The rest fall inbetween.

Every school my wife and I have ever been associated with have written protocols and staff training for how to manage acting out behaviors.  Ones that include situations where the child might potentially injure himself, other students, or staff.  Calling an ambulance should a child be so out of control that he or she might put themselves in a medical crisis requiring emergency treatment is Standard Operating Procedure.  Why many special need schools have a nurse. Especially if they have medically unstable students.

NEVER have I seen a "procedure' that involves putting a child in a police car as part of behavior management program.  

Staff have procedures that they are 'hands on trained' how to physically restrain a student if necessary so as to not cause harm to the student, other students, or staff.  That child's safety was not addressed when he was put unsupervised in the back of a police car.  Want to bet the school says this was based on a 'zero tolerance' school policy?  Following those procedures?  The 'zero tolerance' policies of many public schools has fallen under criticism from a variety of sectors as being inappropriate.  That would include US Dept of Education, our president, teachers organizations, on and on.  It became an excuse NOT to educate children (special needs or not) by simply calling the police and expelling them out of their way.

It should concern any reader that this reminds me of a facility I worked at decades ago.  A private facility for well to do parents to institutionalize a retarded(now mentally disabled) child. Any client that showed any aptitude for maladaptive behaviors was sent to the "Behavior Class" where they learned some very bad behaviors.  It gave new meaning to the term "Behavior Class".

I hope that is not what the schools name now means.  A Behavior Center. A facility that has failed to manage inappropriate behaviors of students.

I encourage every parent of every child in this school district, the Board of Education State and Local, to ask to SEE the written policies in place and training curriculum that the teachers were trained how to manage inappropriate behaviors in school.  You might be surprised about the absence, brevity, or ambiguity  of the policies and procedures they have.  Then act accordingly.

Guidelines say,
"•If your review is about a specific issue, please contact the school directly."
"•Education.com reserves the sole discretion to reject, edit or remove any review at any time."

Thus copy to every paper, organization, PTA, etc that I can find in your community.
Thank you

Dale DuPont,  OT

By , a Parent on

My child didn't exactly fit into general education...  Hillside has the staff and the patience to gift him with a very quality education.  Additionally, the students really do participate in a lot of fun activities!  If your student is ever considered for this program, parents, please do not hesitate.  This is a great opportunity for your child.

By on

I used to volunteer at this school with the youngest students and I thought they were amazing!e

By a Parent on

I love this school. My child has blossomed here and they have worked with us 100%. We have a lot of input and have had no problems in 3 and 1/2 years.

By a Parent on

The services offered to the children at this school are very limited.  This school does everything they can to do as they see fit, exclude parent input.

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