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5 . . . 4 . . . 3 . . . 2 . . . Lite - Blast Off

based on 20 ratings
Author: Maxine Levaren

If you’ve ever shot off a bottle rocket, you’d probably like to know how to make it go even higher. So did Daniel Stenavich, so he made it the main topic of his science project.

The figure shows his project display.

Figure: Project display for “5 . . . 4 . . . 3 . . . 2 . . . liter — Blast off.”

Hypothesis

I believe that the rocket, when launched, will reach its highest altitude when 50 percent of the bottle’s capacity is filled with water.

Materials

  • Bottle rocket (built according to instructions included in the project notebook)
  • Rocket launcher (built according to instructions included in the project notebook)
  • Measuring cup
  • Water
  • Angle finder
  • Tape measure

Procedures

The following procedures explain how to fill the bottle rocket, launch it using the specified amount of water pressure, and measure the angle formed by the altitude that the rocket reaches.

  1. Make bottle rocket. (The instructions for this were explained in the Materials section of the student’s project notebook.)
  2. Make bottle rocket launcher.(The instructions for this were explained in the Materials section of the student’s project notebook.)
  3. Launch an empty bottle rocket five times. Measure the angle of height with angle finder and record the height in feet.
  4. Add 200 ml of water to the bottle rocket and launch it five times. Measure the angle of height with angle finder and record the height in feet.
  5. Add 200 ml of water every 5 launches until the bottle rocket is at full capacity (2,000 ml). Measure the angle of height with angle finder and record the height in feet.

Results

The table shows the results for this project.

Table               Height (in Feet) of Bottle Rocket Launches for Each Trial

Amounts of Water

Trial 1

Trial 2

Trial 3

Trial 4

Trial 5

Average

0 ml

21.1

29.1

29.1

26.4

26.4

26.42

100 ml

48.7

54.5

83.1

60.6

63.6

62.1

200 ml

105

90.1

83.1

113

90.1

96.26

300 ml

97.4

117.1

105

117.1

105

108.32

400 ml

101.1

93.7

83.1

86.6

93.7

91.64

500 ml

93.7

105

86.6

90.1

83.1

91.7

600 ml

105

121.4

101.1

113

108.9

109.88

700 ml

121.4

105

113

113

108.9

112.26

800 ml

144.8

121.4

113

121.4

108.9

121.9

900 ml

125.8

103.3

105

125.8

121.4

116.26

1,000 ml

121.4

121.4

121.4

125.8

125.8

123.16

1,100 ml

113

105

113

113

101.1

109.02

1,150 ml

117.1

117.1

121.4

113

125.8

118.88

1,200 ml

144.8

130.3

125.8

121.4

117.1

127.88

1,250 ml

125.8

125.8

130.3

135

125.8

128.54

1,300 ml

113

97.4

101.1

93.7

121.4

105.32

1,400 ml

86.6

108.9

69.9

66.7

101.1

86.64

1,500 ml

45.8

48.7

51.6

45.8

48.7

48.12

1,600 ml

37.3

26.4

66.7

43

18.4

38.36

1,700 ml

21

18.4

23.7

13.1

18.4

18.92

1,800 ml

7.8

10.4

5.2

7.8

13.1

8.86

1,900 ml

2.6

5.2

2.6

5.2

5.2

4.16

2,000 ml

0

2.6

0

0

2.6

1.04

Average

82.6

80.8

79.8

80.5

79.8

80.7

Conclusions

In most of the launches, the rocket reached the highest altitude when filled with 1200–1250 ml of water. That’s just more than half full.

In conclusion, the hypothesis of filling the bottle with 50 percent water was incorrect. The rocket reached the highest altitude when it was 60 percent full.

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