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Logo Recognition: Effects of Media on Children

Author: TaniaDakka

The Golden Arches, the Mac’s once-bitten Apple, the swirl of Pepsi’s blue and red—these are all logos. Logos are part of each company’s brand, and children are more shopping-savvy because of them. But what logos inform kids more? Do kids only recognize brands advertising to their age group, or do they recognize other brands marketing towards adults too? Let’s find out!

Problem

Which logos are more recognizable to kids?

Materials

  • Printed pictures of adult brand logos: Nike, Shell, Toyota, Starbucks, Chanel, Polo Ralph Lauren, Monster Energy Drink, MasterCard
  • Printed pictures of children’s brand logos: Toys “R” Us, Crayola, Nickelodeon, Disney, DreamWorks
  • Printed pictures of the following historical figures: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Ben Franklin, Martin Luther King Jr., Einstein
  • 10 Volunteers, ages 12-15
  • 10 Volunteers, ages 8-11
  • 10 Volunteers, ages 4-7
  • Paper
  • Pencil

Procedure

  1. Draw the following chart on your paper. This will be where you record your results.

 

Age Group

Recognized Kids’ Logos

Recognized Adult Logos

Recognized Historical Figures

4-7

 

 

 

8-11

 

 

 

12-15

 

 

 

 

Why do you think it is useful to have different age groups for this experiment?

  1. Formulate your hypothesis. Will the adult brand logos or the kids’ brand logos be most recognizable by your volunteers? Which specific brand logos do you think will prove to be most and least recognizable? How many historical figures do you think volunteers will be able to correctly identify?
  2. Show each volunteer the brand logos. Ask them, “What company does this logo belong to?”
  3. Record the results by listing the names of the correctly identified logos in the first and second columns of your chart.
  4. Show each volunteer the pictures of the historical figures. Ask them, “What is this person’s name?”
  5. Record the results by listen the names of the correctly identified historical figures in the third column of your chart.
  6. Tally your results. For each age group, find out how many times volunteers recognized kids’ logos, adult logos, and historical figures.
  7. Analyze your results. Which brand was most recognized? Is it a kid’s brand? Did many kids recognize the brands that are mostly for adults?

Results:

Most kids of all age groups recognize brand logos for kids. But many kids recognize other brands too.

Why?

Marketing and advertising is everywhere. It’s on our TVs, our phones, our computers, and everywhere we go. This constant exposure to companies and the images that represent them are in our faces all the time, so more kids are recognizing brands that are not companies that advertise to children. 

Take a look at which age groups can identify adult brand logos. Are you surprised by how many volunteers in your 4-7 age group could correctly name the companies? Four- to seven-year-olds don’t use credit cards or drive cars, but they see these companies’ advertisements every day. Did any volunteers correctly identify many brand logos, but couldn’t name many of the historical figures? Even though we usually learn about these important people and see their pictures both in and outside of school, company logos are such a part of our lives that they often stick in our memories better.

Digging Deeper

Take this experiment to the next level by asking younger children to identify the logos, or by using more unusual logos mixed in with more common ones. You can also try using only kids’ brand logos or only adult brand logos. Whatever you do, remember to only change one variable at a time to make sure you keep the experiment as accurate as possible.

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